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Bullying and school safety.
J Pediatr 2008; 152(1):123-8, 128.e1JPed

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To identify an association between involvement in bullying and problems in school.

STUDY DESIGN

This was a cross-sectional study of 5391 students in grades 7, 9, and 11 in an urban public school district. The main outcome measure was involvement in bullying. Secondary outcomes included attendance, grade point average, psychosocial distress, and perceived acceptability of carrying guns to school.

RESULTS

Of the 5391 children surveyed, 26% were involved in bullying either as victim, bully, or both (bully-victim). All 3 groups were significantly more likely than bystanders to feel unsafe at school and sad most days. Victims and bully-victims were more likely to say they are "no good." Victims were more likely to feel that they "do not belong" in their school. The odds of being a victim (vs a bystander) were 10% lower for every 1 point increase in grade point average. Bully-victims were more likely to say that it is "not wrong" to take a gun to school.

CONCLUSIONS

Associations between involvement in bullying and academic achievement, psychological distress, and the belief that it is not wrong to take a gun to school reinforce the notion that school environment is interrelated with mental health and school success.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Genetics and Developmental Medicine, Children's Hospital and Regional Medical Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98105-0371, USA. glew@u.washington.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18154913

Citation

Glew, Gwen M., et al. "Bullying and School Safety." The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 152, no. 1, 2008, pp. 123-8, 128.e1.
Glew GM, Fan MY, Katon W, et al. Bullying and school safety. J Pediatr. 2008;152(1):123-8, 128.e1.
Glew, G. M., Fan, M. Y., Katon, W., & Rivara, F. P. (2008). Bullying and school safety. The Journal of Pediatrics, 152(1), pp. 123-8, 128.e1.
Glew GM, et al. Bullying and School Safety. J Pediatr. 2008;152(1):123-8, 128.e1. PubMed PMID: 18154913.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bullying and school safety. AU - Glew,Gwen M, AU - Fan,Ming-Yu, AU - Katon,Wayne, AU - Rivara,Frederick P, Y1 - 2007/10/22/ PY - 2006/09/18/received PY - 2007/05/01/revised PY - 2007/05/25/accepted PY - 2007/12/25/pubmed PY - 2008/1/8/medline PY - 2007/12/25/entrez SP - 123-8, 128.e1 JF - The Journal of pediatrics JO - J. Pediatr. VL - 152 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To identify an association between involvement in bullying and problems in school. STUDY DESIGN: This was a cross-sectional study of 5391 students in grades 7, 9, and 11 in an urban public school district. The main outcome measure was involvement in bullying. Secondary outcomes included attendance, grade point average, psychosocial distress, and perceived acceptability of carrying guns to school. RESULTS: Of the 5391 children surveyed, 26% were involved in bullying either as victim, bully, or both (bully-victim). All 3 groups were significantly more likely than bystanders to feel unsafe at school and sad most days. Victims and bully-victims were more likely to say they are "no good." Victims were more likely to feel that they "do not belong" in their school. The odds of being a victim (vs a bystander) were 10% lower for every 1 point increase in grade point average. Bully-victims were more likely to say that it is "not wrong" to take a gun to school. CONCLUSIONS: Associations between involvement in bullying and academic achievement, psychological distress, and the belief that it is not wrong to take a gun to school reinforce the notion that school environment is interrelated with mental health and school success. SN - 1097-6833 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18154913/Bullying_and_school_safety_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3476(07)00549-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -