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Effect of method of applying fibrolytic enzymes or ammonia to Bermudagrass hay on feed intake, digestion, and growth of beef steers.
J Anim Sci 2008; 86(4):882-9JA

Abstract

This study examined how different methods of applying a fibrolytic enzyme or ammonia affect the nutritive value of Bermudagrass hay and the performance of beef cattle. Fifty Angus x Brangus crossbred steers (mean initial BW 244 +/- 26 kg) were individually fed for ad libitum intake of a 5-wk regrowth of a mixture of Florakirk and Tifton 44 Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers] hay for 84 d with a concentrate supplement (77% soybean hull pellets, 23% cottonseed meal (DM basis) fed at 1% of BW daily. The Bermudagrass was conserved as hay without treatment (control), with NH(3) (30 g/kg of DM), or with a fibrolytic enzyme (16.5 g/t, air-dry basis) that was applied immediately after cutting (Ec), at baling (Eb), or at feeding. Chromic oxide was dosed to steers for 10 consecutive days, and fecal Cr concentrations from the last 5 d were used to estimate apparent total tract digestibility. In situ ruminal DM degradability was measured by incubating ground (4-mm) hay samples in duplicate in each of 2 ruminally cannulated cows having ad libitum access to Bermudagrass hay and 500 g/d of soybean meal. Unlike the enzyme treatment, ammoniation increased (P < 0.001) the CP concentration and reduced (P < 0.001) NDF, hemicellulose, and lignin concentrations of hay. Total DMI was greater (P < 0.05) for steers fed hays treated with Ec or NH(3) than for those fed control hays. All additive treatments increased (P < 0.05) DM digestibility, and NH(3), Ec, and Eb treatments also increased (P < 0.01) NDF digestibility. The initial and final BW, ADG, BCS, G:F, and hip height of the steers were not affected (P > 0.05) by treatment. The wash loss fractions in hays treated with Ec and Eb were lower than that in the control hay, but the potentially degradable fraction, total degradable fraction, and the effective degradability were increased (P < 0.01) by NH(3) treatment. Application at cutting was the most promising method of enzyme treatment, and this treatment was almost as effective as ammonia for enhancing forage quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Sciences, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville 32611, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18156364

Citation

Krueger, N A., et al. "Effect of Method of Applying Fibrolytic Enzymes or Ammonia to Bermudagrass Hay On Feed Intake, Digestion, and Growth of Beef Steers." Journal of Animal Science, vol. 86, no. 4, 2008, pp. 882-9.
Krueger NA, Adesogan AT, Staples CR, et al. Effect of method of applying fibrolytic enzymes or ammonia to Bermudagrass hay on feed intake, digestion, and growth of beef steers. J Anim Sci. 2008;86(4):882-9.
Krueger, N. A., Adesogan, A. T., Staples, C. R., Krueger, W. K., Kim, S. C., Littell, R. C., & Sollenberger, L. E. (2008). Effect of method of applying fibrolytic enzymes or ammonia to Bermudagrass hay on feed intake, digestion, and growth of beef steers. Journal of Animal Science, 86(4), pp. 882-9.
Krueger NA, et al. Effect of Method of Applying Fibrolytic Enzymes or Ammonia to Bermudagrass Hay On Feed Intake, Digestion, and Growth of Beef Steers. J Anim Sci. 2008;86(4):882-9. PubMed PMID: 18156364.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of method of applying fibrolytic enzymes or ammonia to Bermudagrass hay on feed intake, digestion, and growth of beef steers. AU - Krueger,N A, AU - Adesogan,A T, AU - Staples,C R, AU - Krueger,W K, AU - Kim,S C, AU - Littell,R C, AU - Sollenberger,L E, Y1 - 2007/12/21/ PY - 2007/12/25/pubmed PY - 2008/4/22/medline PY - 2007/12/25/entrez SP - 882 EP - 9 JF - Journal of animal science JO - J. Anim. Sci. VL - 86 IS - 4 N2 - This study examined how different methods of applying a fibrolytic enzyme or ammonia affect the nutritive value of Bermudagrass hay and the performance of beef cattle. Fifty Angus x Brangus crossbred steers (mean initial BW 244 +/- 26 kg) were individually fed for ad libitum intake of a 5-wk regrowth of a mixture of Florakirk and Tifton 44 Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers] hay for 84 d with a concentrate supplement (77% soybean hull pellets, 23% cottonseed meal (DM basis) fed at 1% of BW daily. The Bermudagrass was conserved as hay without treatment (control), with NH(3) (30 g/kg of DM), or with a fibrolytic enzyme (16.5 g/t, air-dry basis) that was applied immediately after cutting (Ec), at baling (Eb), or at feeding. Chromic oxide was dosed to steers for 10 consecutive days, and fecal Cr concentrations from the last 5 d were used to estimate apparent total tract digestibility. In situ ruminal DM degradability was measured by incubating ground (4-mm) hay samples in duplicate in each of 2 ruminally cannulated cows having ad libitum access to Bermudagrass hay and 500 g/d of soybean meal. Unlike the enzyme treatment, ammoniation increased (P < 0.001) the CP concentration and reduced (P < 0.001) NDF, hemicellulose, and lignin concentrations of hay. Total DMI was greater (P < 0.05) for steers fed hays treated with Ec or NH(3) than for those fed control hays. All additive treatments increased (P < 0.05) DM digestibility, and NH(3), Ec, and Eb treatments also increased (P < 0.01) NDF digestibility. The initial and final BW, ADG, BCS, G:F, and hip height of the steers were not affected (P > 0.05) by treatment. The wash loss fractions in hays treated with Ec and Eb were lower than that in the control hay, but the potentially degradable fraction, total degradable fraction, and the effective degradability were increased (P < 0.01) by NH(3) treatment. Application at cutting was the most promising method of enzyme treatment, and this treatment was almost as effective as ammonia for enhancing forage quality. SN - 1525-3163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18156364/Effect_of_method_of_applying_fibrolytic_enzymes_or_ammonia_to_Bermudagrass_hay_on_feed_intake_digestion_and_growth_of_beef_steers_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jas/article-lookup/doi/10.2527/jas.2006-717 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -