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Obesity and mental disorders in the adult general population.
J Psychosom Res. 2008 Jan; 64(1):97-105.JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of this study was to investigate (i) the associations between mental disorders (in particular the anxiety disorders) and obesity in the general population and (ii) potential moderators of those associations (ethnicity, age, sex, and education).

METHODS

A nationally representative face-to-face household survey was conducted in New Zealand with 12,992 participants 16 years and older, achieving a response rate of 73.3%. Ethnic subgroups (Maori and Pacific peoples) were oversampled. Mental disorders were measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0). Height and weight were self-reported. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m(2) or greater.

RESULTS

Obesity was significantly associated with any mood disorder (OR 1.23), major depressive disorder (OR 1.27), any anxiety disorder (OR 1.46), and most strongly with some individual anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (OR 2.64). Sociodemographic correlates moderated the association between obesity and mood disorders but were less influential in obesity-anxiety disorder associations. Adjustment for the comorbidity between anxiety and mood disorders made little difference to the relationship between obesity and anxiety disorders (OR 1.36) but rendered the association between obesity and mood disorders insignificant (OR 1.05).

CONCLUSION

Stronger associations were observed between anxiety disorders and obesity than between mood disorders and obesity; the association between PTSD and obesity is a novel finding. These findings are interpreted in light of research on the role of anxiety in eating pathology, and deserve the further attention of researchers and clinicians.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychological Medicine, Wellington School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Otago University, New Zealand. kate.scott@otago.ac.nz <kate.scott@otago.ac.nz>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18158005

Citation

Scott, Kate M., et al. "Obesity and Mental Disorders in the Adult General Population." Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 64, no. 1, 2008, pp. 97-105.
Scott KM, McGee MA, Wells JE, et al. Obesity and mental disorders in the adult general population. J Psychosom Res. 2008;64(1):97-105.
Scott, K. M., McGee, M. A., Wells, J. E., & Oakley Browne, M. A. (2008). Obesity and mental disorders in the adult general population. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 64(1), 97-105.
Scott KM, et al. Obesity and Mental Disorders in the Adult General Population. J Psychosom Res. 2008;64(1):97-105. PubMed PMID: 18158005.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Obesity and mental disorders in the adult general population. AU - Scott,Kate M, AU - McGee,Magnus A, AU - Wells,J Elisabeth, AU - Oakley Browne,Mark A, PY - 2007/02/20/received PY - 2007/07/27/revised PY - 2007/09/27/accepted PY - 2007/12/26/pubmed PY - 2008/5/17/medline PY - 2007/12/26/entrez SP - 97 EP - 105 JF - Journal of psychosomatic research JO - J Psychosom Res VL - 64 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate (i) the associations between mental disorders (in particular the anxiety disorders) and obesity in the general population and (ii) potential moderators of those associations (ethnicity, age, sex, and education). METHODS: A nationally representative face-to-face household survey was conducted in New Zealand with 12,992 participants 16 years and older, achieving a response rate of 73.3%. Ethnic subgroups (Maori and Pacific peoples) were oversampled. Mental disorders were measured with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0). Height and weight were self-reported. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m(2) or greater. RESULTS: Obesity was significantly associated with any mood disorder (OR 1.23), major depressive disorder (OR 1.27), any anxiety disorder (OR 1.46), and most strongly with some individual anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (OR 2.64). Sociodemographic correlates moderated the association between obesity and mood disorders but were less influential in obesity-anxiety disorder associations. Adjustment for the comorbidity between anxiety and mood disorders made little difference to the relationship between obesity and anxiety disorders (OR 1.36) but rendered the association between obesity and mood disorders insignificant (OR 1.05). CONCLUSION: Stronger associations were observed between anxiety disorders and obesity than between mood disorders and obesity; the association between PTSD and obesity is a novel finding. These findings are interpreted in light of research on the role of anxiety in eating pathology, and deserve the further attention of researchers and clinicians. SN - 0022-3999 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18158005/Obesity_and_mental_disorders_in_the_adult_general_population_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3999(07)00364-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -