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Association of serum lipid indices with large artery atherosclerotic stroke.
Neurology. 2008 Mar 11; 70(11):841-7.Neur

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) is the primary lipid target for vascular risk reduction in stroke patients, but emerging data suggest that other lipid indices may better predict vascular hazard. We evaluated the relationship between several measures of the classically obtained serum lipid panel and the occurrence of large artery atherosclerotic stroke.

METHODS

Data prospectively collected over a 4-year period on subjects admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA to a university medical center were analyzed. Independent associations of fasting serum lipid indices with large artery atherosclerotic (LAA) stroke mechanism were evaluated.

RESULTS

Of 1,049 patients, 247 (23.5%) were classified with LAA, 224 (21.4%) were classified with small vessel disease (SVD), and 578 (55%) were non-LAA, non-SVD subtype. Lipid levels were similar between LAA and SVD patients. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), and triglyceride:HDL ratio were significantly higher in LAA vs non-LAA, non-SVD patients. After adjustment for age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, body mass index, and premorbid statin use, significant odds ratios (ORs) for LAA compared with all other ischemic stroke subtypes for patients in the uppermost lipid quartiles (vs lowest) were triglycerides (OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.44 to 5.02) and non-HDL (OR 2.39, 95% CI 1.40 to 4.11). LDL was not associated with LAA.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with all other ischemic stroke subtypes, elevated levels of serum triglycerides and non-high-density lipoprotein, but not low-density lipoprotein (LDL), are associated with large artery atherosclerotic stroke. These non-LDL lipid measures may have utility in delineating atherosclerotic stroke risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, University of California at Los Angeles, 710 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18160673

Citation

Bang, O Y., et al. "Association of Serum Lipid Indices With Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke." Neurology, vol. 70, no. 11, 2008, pp. 841-7.
Bang OY, Saver JL, Liebeskind DS, et al. Association of serum lipid indices with large artery atherosclerotic stroke. Neurology. 2008;70(11):841-7.
Bang, O. Y., Saver, J. L., Liebeskind, D. S., Pineda, S., & Ovbiagele, B. (2008). Association of serum lipid indices with large artery atherosclerotic stroke. Neurology, 70(11), 841-7.
Bang OY, et al. Association of Serum Lipid Indices With Large Artery Atherosclerotic Stroke. Neurology. 2008 Mar 11;70(11):841-7. PubMed PMID: 18160673.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of serum lipid indices with large artery atherosclerotic stroke. AU - Bang,O Y, AU - Saver,J L, AU - Liebeskind,D S, AU - Pineda,S, AU - Ovbiagele,B, Y1 - 2007/12/26/ PY - 2007/12/28/pubmed PY - 2008/4/9/medline PY - 2007/12/28/entrez SP - 841 EP - 7 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 70 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) is the primary lipid target for vascular risk reduction in stroke patients, but emerging data suggest that other lipid indices may better predict vascular hazard. We evaluated the relationship between several measures of the classically obtained serum lipid panel and the occurrence of large artery atherosclerotic stroke. METHODS: Data prospectively collected over a 4-year period on subjects admitted with ischemic stroke or TIA to a university medical center were analyzed. Independent associations of fasting serum lipid indices with large artery atherosclerotic (LAA) stroke mechanism were evaluated. RESULTS: Of 1,049 patients, 247 (23.5%) were classified with LAA, 224 (21.4%) were classified with small vessel disease (SVD), and 578 (55%) were non-LAA, non-SVD subtype. Lipid levels were similar between LAA and SVD patients. Total cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), and triglyceride:HDL ratio were significantly higher in LAA vs non-LAA, non-SVD patients. After adjustment for age, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, body mass index, and premorbid statin use, significant odds ratios (ORs) for LAA compared with all other ischemic stroke subtypes for patients in the uppermost lipid quartiles (vs lowest) were triglycerides (OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.44 to 5.02) and non-HDL (OR 2.39, 95% CI 1.40 to 4.11). LDL was not associated with LAA. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with all other ischemic stroke subtypes, elevated levels of serum triglycerides and non-high-density lipoprotein, but not low-density lipoprotein (LDL), are associated with large artery atherosclerotic stroke. These non-LDL lipid measures may have utility in delineating atherosclerotic stroke risk. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18160673/Association_of_serum_lipid_indices_with_large_artery_atherosclerotic_stroke_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18160673 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -