Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Symptoms in the menopausal transition: hormone and behavioral correlates.
Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Jan; 111(1):127-36.OG

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To estimate the association of headache, irritability, mood swings, anxiety, and concentration difficulties with menopausal stage and with reproductive hormones in the menopausal transition.

METHODS

Women in the Penn Ovarian Aging Study were assessed longitudinally for 9 years. Data were obtained from structured interviews, a validated symptom questionnaire, menstrual bleeding dates, and early follicular hormone measures of estradiol (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and testosterone. Menopausal stages were based on menstrual bleeding patterns. Other risk factors included history of depression, perceived stress, premenstrual syndrome, current smoking, age, and race. Generalized linear regression models for repeated measures were used to estimate associations among the variables with each symptom.

RESULTS

Headache decreased in the transition to menopause and was significantly associated with menopausal stage in univariable analysis (P=.002). Mood swings were inversely associated with mean FSH levels (P=.005). Irritability was inversely associated with mean levels of FSH (P=.017) and testosterone (P=.008). In multivariable models, the independent contributions of other covariates were strongly associated with these symptoms: premenstrual syndrome (P<.001) and perceived stress (P<.001) for irritability and mood swings; P=.018 for headache. There was 80% power with 0.05 alpha to detect a decrease of 13% or more in the prevalence of the symptoms in the postmenopausal stage compared with the premenopausal stage.

CONCLUSION

Headache significantly decreased in the transition to menopause. Irritability and mood swings also decreased in the menopausal transition as assessed by hormone levels. The findings indicate that these symptoms that are commonly linked with menopause diminish with the physiologic changes of the menopausal transition.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE

II.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. freemane@mail.med.upenn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18165401

Citation

Freeman, Ellen W., et al. "Symptoms in the Menopausal Transition: Hormone and Behavioral Correlates." Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 111, no. 1, 2008, pp. 127-36.
Freeman EW, Sammel MD, Lin H, et al. Symptoms in the menopausal transition: hormone and behavioral correlates. Obstet Gynecol. 2008;111(1):127-36.
Freeman, E. W., Sammel, M. D., Lin, H., Gracia, C. R., & Kapoor, S. (2008). Symptoms in the menopausal transition: hormone and behavioral correlates. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 111(1), 127-36. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.AOG.0000295867.06184.b1
Freeman EW, et al. Symptoms in the Menopausal Transition: Hormone and Behavioral Correlates. Obstet Gynecol. 2008;111(1):127-36. PubMed PMID: 18165401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Symptoms in the menopausal transition: hormone and behavioral correlates. AU - Freeman,Ellen W, AU - Sammel,Mary D, AU - Lin,Hui, AU - Gracia,Clarisa R, AU - Kapoor,Shiv, PY - 2008/1/1/pubmed PY - 2008/2/15/medline PY - 2008/1/1/entrez SP - 127 EP - 36 JF - Obstetrics and gynecology JO - Obstet Gynecol VL - 111 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To estimate the association of headache, irritability, mood swings, anxiety, and concentration difficulties with menopausal stage and with reproductive hormones in the menopausal transition. METHODS: Women in the Penn Ovarian Aging Study were assessed longitudinally for 9 years. Data were obtained from structured interviews, a validated symptom questionnaire, menstrual bleeding dates, and early follicular hormone measures of estradiol (E2), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and testosterone. Menopausal stages were based on menstrual bleeding patterns. Other risk factors included history of depression, perceived stress, premenstrual syndrome, current smoking, age, and race. Generalized linear regression models for repeated measures were used to estimate associations among the variables with each symptom. RESULTS: Headache decreased in the transition to menopause and was significantly associated with menopausal stage in univariable analysis (P=.002). Mood swings were inversely associated with mean FSH levels (P=.005). Irritability was inversely associated with mean levels of FSH (P=.017) and testosterone (P=.008). In multivariable models, the independent contributions of other covariates were strongly associated with these symptoms: premenstrual syndrome (P<.001) and perceived stress (P<.001) for irritability and mood swings; P=.018 for headache. There was 80% power with 0.05 alpha to detect a decrease of 13% or more in the prevalence of the symptoms in the postmenopausal stage compared with the premenopausal stage. CONCLUSION: Headache significantly decreased in the transition to menopause. Irritability and mood swings also decreased in the menopausal transition as assessed by hormone levels. The findings indicate that these symptoms that are commonly linked with menopause diminish with the physiologic changes of the menopausal transition. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II. SN - 0029-7844 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18165401/Symptoms_in_the_menopausal_transition:_hormone_and_behavioral_correlates_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -