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Screening for osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa: prevalence and predictors of reduced bone mineral density.
Int J Eat Disord. 2008 Apr; 41(3):284-7.IJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) in anorexia nervosa (AN) can be detected easily by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). This study was designed to assess the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in AN, identify predictors, and determine the diagnostic yield of screening with DXA.

METHOD

DXA was used to screen 59 unselected adult patients with a history of AN.

RESULTS

Osteoporosis was identified in 18 patients (31%) and osteopenia in 30 (51%). The spine had a lower mean T-score than either the hip or femur. BMI significantly predicted T-score (p = 0.0006) and the odds of having osteoporosis (p = 0.0188). There was a significant association between use of oestrogens and the presence of osteoporosis or osteopenia (p = 0.0491). There was no significant association between duration of AN and T-score. A duration of AN of less than 1 year was found in 12% of those with osteoporosis.

CONCLUSION

BMI is a strong predictor of BMD in AN. DXA is an effective screening tool and should probably be offered routinely.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Eating Disorders Unit, Woodleigh Beeches Centre, Warwick Hospital, Warwick, United Kingdom. Anthony.Winston@covwarkpt.nhs.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18176948

Citation

Winston, Anthony P., et al. "Screening for Osteoporosis in Anorexia Nervosa: Prevalence and Predictors of Reduced Bone Mineral Density." The International Journal of Eating Disorders, vol. 41, no. 3, 2008, pp. 284-7.
Winston AP, Alwazeer AE, Bankart MJ. Screening for osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa: prevalence and predictors of reduced bone mineral density. Int J Eat Disord. 2008;41(3):284-7.
Winston, A. P., Alwazeer, A. E., & Bankart, M. J. (2008). Screening for osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa: prevalence and predictors of reduced bone mineral density. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 41(3), 284-7. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.20501
Winston AP, Alwazeer AE, Bankart MJ. Screening for Osteoporosis in Anorexia Nervosa: Prevalence and Predictors of Reduced Bone Mineral Density. Int J Eat Disord. 2008;41(3):284-7. PubMed PMID: 18176948.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Screening for osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa: prevalence and predictors of reduced bone mineral density. AU - Winston,Anthony P, AU - Alwazeer,Ahmed E F, AU - Bankart,Michael J G, PY - 2008/1/8/pubmed PY - 2008/5/1/medline PY - 2008/1/8/entrez SP - 284 EP - 7 JF - The International journal of eating disorders JO - Int J Eat Disord VL - 41 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) in anorexia nervosa (AN) can be detected easily by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). This study was designed to assess the prevalence of osteoporosis and osteopenia in AN, identify predictors, and determine the diagnostic yield of screening with DXA. METHOD: DXA was used to screen 59 unselected adult patients with a history of AN. RESULTS: Osteoporosis was identified in 18 patients (31%) and osteopenia in 30 (51%). The spine had a lower mean T-score than either the hip or femur. BMI significantly predicted T-score (p = 0.0006) and the odds of having osteoporosis (p = 0.0188). There was a significant association between use of oestrogens and the presence of osteoporosis or osteopenia (p = 0.0491). There was no significant association between duration of AN and T-score. A duration of AN of less than 1 year was found in 12% of those with osteoporosis. CONCLUSION: BMI is a strong predictor of BMD in AN. DXA is an effective screening tool and should probably be offered routinely. SN - 1098-108X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18176948/Screening_for_osteoporosis_in_anorexia_nervosa:_prevalence_and_predictors_of_reduced_bone_mineral_density_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.20501 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -