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Microbiologic study of soft contact lenses after laser subepithelial keratectomy for myopia.
Eye Contact Lens. 2008 Jan; 34(1):24-7.EC

Abstract

PURPOSE

To evaluate the extent and agents of bacterial contamination of bandage disposable soft contact lenses after laser subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK) and to correlate the findings with clinical data.

METHODS

Disposable soft contact lenses were collected from 52 eyes of 26 consecutive patients treated with LASEK for myopia. The patients were treated with a fixed combination of tobramycin and diclofenac until epithelial closure. The lenses were removed on the fourth or fifth postoperative day with sterile forceps and immediately placed in sterile tubes containing culture media brain-heart infusion broth. The lenses were evaluated for microbial colonization.

RESULTS

Of the 52 contact lenses analyzed, six (11.5%) had positive cultures. However, no clinical finding of infection was noted. Isolated microorganisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci (two lenses), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (two lenses), Acinetobacter species (one lens), and Aeromonas hydrophila (one lens). Except for one case, the microorganisms were sensitive to the administered antibiotic.

CONCLUSIONS

The risk of infectious keratitis after LASEK seems to be low. Except for staphylococci, the isolated microorganisms have not been previously reported to colonize the ocular surface or cause keratitis after refractive surgery. These findings may suggest a changing trend of potentially infectious agents after surface ablation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dinar State Hospital, Afyonkarahisar, Turkey. ahondur@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18180679

Citation

Hondur, Ahmet, et al. "Microbiologic Study of Soft Contact Lenses After Laser Subepithelial Keratectomy for Myopia." Eye & Contact Lens, vol. 34, no. 1, 2008, pp. 24-7.
Hondur A, Bilgihan K, Cirak MY, et al. Microbiologic study of soft contact lenses after laser subepithelial keratectomy for myopia. Eye Contact Lens. 2008;34(1):24-7.
Hondur, A., Bilgihan, K., Cirak, M. Y., Dogan, O., Erdinc, A., & Hasanreisoglu, B. (2008). Microbiologic study of soft contact lenses after laser subepithelial keratectomy for myopia. Eye & Contact Lens, 34(1), 24-7. https://doi.org/10.1097/ICL.0b013e31805881c2
Hondur A, et al. Microbiologic Study of Soft Contact Lenses After Laser Subepithelial Keratectomy for Myopia. Eye Contact Lens. 2008;34(1):24-7. PubMed PMID: 18180679.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Microbiologic study of soft contact lenses after laser subepithelial keratectomy for myopia. AU - Hondur,Ahmet, AU - Bilgihan,Kamil, AU - Cirak,Meltem Yalinay, AU - Dogan,Ozgur, AU - Erdinc,Alper, AU - Hasanreisoglu,Berati, PY - 2008/1/9/pubmed PY - 2008/4/9/medline PY - 2008/1/9/entrez SP - 24 EP - 7 JF - Eye & contact lens JO - Eye Contact Lens VL - 34 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: To evaluate the extent and agents of bacterial contamination of bandage disposable soft contact lenses after laser subepithelial keratectomy (LASEK) and to correlate the findings with clinical data. METHODS: Disposable soft contact lenses were collected from 52 eyes of 26 consecutive patients treated with LASEK for myopia. The patients were treated with a fixed combination of tobramycin and diclofenac until epithelial closure. The lenses were removed on the fourth or fifth postoperative day with sterile forceps and immediately placed in sterile tubes containing culture media brain-heart infusion broth. The lenses were evaluated for microbial colonization. RESULTS: Of the 52 contact lenses analyzed, six (11.5%) had positive cultures. However, no clinical finding of infection was noted. Isolated microorganisms were coagulase-negative staphylococci (two lenses), Stenotrophomonas maltophilia (two lenses), Acinetobacter species (one lens), and Aeromonas hydrophila (one lens). Except for one case, the microorganisms were sensitive to the administered antibiotic. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of infectious keratitis after LASEK seems to be low. Except for staphylococci, the isolated microorganisms have not been previously reported to colonize the ocular surface or cause keratitis after refractive surgery. These findings may suggest a changing trend of potentially infectious agents after surface ablation. SN - 1542-2321 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18180679/Microbiologic_study_of_soft_contact_lenses_after_laser_subepithelial_keratectomy_for_myopia_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/ICL.0b013e31805881c2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -