Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Epidemiology of soy exposures and breast cancer risk.
Br J Cancer. 2008 Jan 15; 98(1):9-14.BJ

Abstract

Most of the early studies published on soy and breast cancer were not designed to test the effect of soy; the assessment of soy intake was usually crude and few potential confounders were considered in the analysis. In this review, we focused on studies with relatively complete assessment of dietary soy exposure in the targeted populations and appropriate consideration for potential confounders in the statistical analysis of study data. Meta-analysis of the 8 (1 cohort, 7 case-control) studies conducted in high-soy-consuming Asians show a significant trend of decreasing risk with increasing soy food intake. Compared to the lowest level of soy food intake (<or=5 mg isoflavones per day), risk was intermediate (OR=0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.78-0.98) among those with modest (approximately 10 mg isoflavones per day) intake and lowest (OR=0.71, 95% CI=0.60-0.85) among those with high intake (>or=20 mg isoflavones per day). In contrast, soy intake was unrelated to breast cancer risk in studies conducted in the 11 low-soy-consuming Western populations whose average highest and lowest soy isoflavone intake levels were around 0.8 and 0.15 mg per day, respectively. Thus, the evidence to date, based largely on case-control studies, suggest that soy food intake in the amount consumed in Asian populations may have protective effects against breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9175, USA. annawu@usc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18182974

Citation

Wu, A H., et al. "Epidemiology of Soy Exposures and Breast Cancer Risk." British Journal of Cancer, vol. 98, no. 1, 2008, pp. 9-14.
Wu AH, Yu MC, Tseng CC, et al. Epidemiology of soy exposures and breast cancer risk. Br J Cancer. 2008;98(1):9-14.
Wu, A. H., Yu, M. C., Tseng, C. C., & Pike, M. C. (2008). Epidemiology of soy exposures and breast cancer risk. British Journal of Cancer, 98(1), 9-14. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604145
Wu AH, et al. Epidemiology of Soy Exposures and Breast Cancer Risk. Br J Cancer. 2008 Jan 15;98(1):9-14. PubMed PMID: 18182974.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of soy exposures and breast cancer risk. AU - Wu,A H, AU - Yu,M C, AU - Tseng,C-C, AU - Pike,M C, Y1 - 2008/01/08/ PY - 2008/1/10/pubmed PY - 2008/3/26/medline PY - 2008/1/10/entrez SP - 9 EP - 14 JF - British journal of cancer JO - Br. J. Cancer VL - 98 IS - 1 N2 - Most of the early studies published on soy and breast cancer were not designed to test the effect of soy; the assessment of soy intake was usually crude and few potential confounders were considered in the analysis. In this review, we focused on studies with relatively complete assessment of dietary soy exposure in the targeted populations and appropriate consideration for potential confounders in the statistical analysis of study data. Meta-analysis of the 8 (1 cohort, 7 case-control) studies conducted in high-soy-consuming Asians show a significant trend of decreasing risk with increasing soy food intake. Compared to the lowest level of soy food intake (<or=5 mg isoflavones per day), risk was intermediate (OR=0.88, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.78-0.98) among those with modest (approximately 10 mg isoflavones per day) intake and lowest (OR=0.71, 95% CI=0.60-0.85) among those with high intake (>or=20 mg isoflavones per day). In contrast, soy intake was unrelated to breast cancer risk in studies conducted in the 11 low-soy-consuming Western populations whose average highest and lowest soy isoflavone intake levels were around 0.8 and 0.15 mg per day, respectively. Thus, the evidence to date, based largely on case-control studies, suggest that soy food intake in the amount consumed in Asian populations may have protective effects against breast cancer. SN - 0007-0920 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18182974/Epidemiology_of_soy_exposures_and_breast_cancer_risk_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604145 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.