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Child health and parental stress in school-age children with a preschool diagnosis of developmental delay.
J Child Neurol. 2008 Jan; 23(1):32-8.JC

Abstract

Chronic disorders are known to have a wide-ranging impact on overall health and family dynamics. The objective of this study was to assess child health and well-being and parental stress in a cohort of school-age children diagnosed before school entry with either global developmental delay or developmental language impairment. In total, 65 children with preschool developmental delay were assessed at school age (mean +/- SD age: 7.3 +/- 0.7 years) with the Child Health Questionnaire and Parenting Stress Index, with a mean interval between assessment of 3.9 years. Almost all children who completed testing (60/62) continued to show developmental impairments across domains. On the Child Health Questionnaire, children showed the greatest impairment on the mental health scale (median z score: -0.9). The median Child Health Questionnaire psychosocial health score (40.7) was almost 1 SD below established normative values (P < .001). More than 40% of parents had a Parenting Stress Index above the 85th percentile (clinically significant parenting stress). Using multiple linear regression analysis, high levels of parenting stress were best predicted by a child's Child Health Questionnaire psychosocial health score (r2 = 0.49, P < .001). Thus, 4 years after a preschool-age diagnosis of developmental delay, poor psychosocial health was a common comorbidity. Almost half the parents showed clinically significant levels of parenting stress. There is a need to both recognize and provide ongoing social and emotional support for young children diagnosed with developmental disability and their families.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, School of Pysical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18184941

Citation

Webster, Richard I., et al. "Child Health and Parental Stress in School-age Children With a Preschool Diagnosis of Developmental Delay." Journal of Child Neurology, vol. 23, no. 1, 2008, pp. 32-8.
Webster RI, Majnemer A, Platt RW, et al. Child health and parental stress in school-age children with a preschool diagnosis of developmental delay. J Child Neurol. 2008;23(1):32-8.
Webster, R. I., Majnemer, A., Platt, R. W., & Shevell, M. I. (2008). Child health and parental stress in school-age children with a preschool diagnosis of developmental delay. Journal of Child Neurology, 23(1), 32-8. https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073807307977
Webster RI, et al. Child Health and Parental Stress in School-age Children With a Preschool Diagnosis of Developmental Delay. J Child Neurol. 2008;23(1):32-8. PubMed PMID: 18184941.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Child health and parental stress in school-age children with a preschool diagnosis of developmental delay. AU - Webster,Richard I, AU - Majnemer,Annette, AU - Platt,Robert W, AU - Shevell,Michael I, PY - 2008/1/11/pubmed PY - 2008/3/8/medline PY - 2008/1/11/entrez SP - 32 EP - 8 JF - Journal of child neurology JO - J Child Neurol VL - 23 IS - 1 N2 - Chronic disorders are known to have a wide-ranging impact on overall health and family dynamics. The objective of this study was to assess child health and well-being and parental stress in a cohort of school-age children diagnosed before school entry with either global developmental delay or developmental language impairment. In total, 65 children with preschool developmental delay were assessed at school age (mean +/- SD age: 7.3 +/- 0.7 years) with the Child Health Questionnaire and Parenting Stress Index, with a mean interval between assessment of 3.9 years. Almost all children who completed testing (60/62) continued to show developmental impairments across domains. On the Child Health Questionnaire, children showed the greatest impairment on the mental health scale (median z score: -0.9). The median Child Health Questionnaire psychosocial health score (40.7) was almost 1 SD below established normative values (P < .001). More than 40% of parents had a Parenting Stress Index above the 85th percentile (clinically significant parenting stress). Using multiple linear regression analysis, high levels of parenting stress were best predicted by a child's Child Health Questionnaire psychosocial health score (r2 = 0.49, P < .001). Thus, 4 years after a preschool-age diagnosis of developmental delay, poor psychosocial health was a common comorbidity. Almost half the parents showed clinically significant levels of parenting stress. There is a need to both recognize and provide ongoing social and emotional support for young children diagnosed with developmental disability and their families. SN - 0883-0738 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18184941/Child_health_and_parental_stress_in_school_age_children_with_a_preschool_diagnosis_of_developmental_delay_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0883073807307977?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -