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Are demographic characteristics, health care access and utilization, and comorbid conditions associated with hypertension among US adults?
Am J Hypertens. 2008 Feb; 21(2):159-65.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Little is known about the factors associated with hypertension awareness, treatment, and control. We examined the association of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, risk factors, health care access and utilization, and hypertension awareness, treatment, and control.

METHODS

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004, a continuous, annual survey of the civilian non-institutionalized US population. The sample comprised 4,816 hypertensive persons aged 20+ years.

RESULTS

Adults > or =60 years were more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension compared with adults 40-59 years old (60-69 years old: odds ratio (OR) 1.69, confidence interval (CI) 1.31-2.17; 80+ years old: OR 3.56, CI 2.42-5.25, respectively). Compared to men, women were more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension (OR 1.29, CI 1.01-1.64). When compared with non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks were more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension (OR 1.40, CI 1.10-1.79). Diabetes and Poverty Income Ratio (PIR) classification of <1 were associated with increased likelihood of uncontrolled hypertension (OR 2.69, CI 1.99-3.63; OR 1.68, CI 1.19-2.37; respectively). Persons without health insurance had higher odds of being untreated when compared with insured persons (OR 2.38, CI 1.71-3.32). Younger age (20-39 years), lack of risk factors for hypertension and less health care were associated with increased odds of being unaware of hypertension.

CONCLUSIONS

Uncontrolled hypertension is more likely among women, older persons (> or =60 years), non-Hispanic blacks, the poor, and diabetics. Hypertension awareness and treatment is lower among the young (20-39 years), the uninsured, individuals reporting fewer health risk factors, and adults with less exposure and utilization of health care.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Center for Health Statistics, Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Hyattsville, Maryland, USA. yxo1@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18188162

Citation

Ostchega, Yechiam, et al. "Are Demographic Characteristics, Health Care Access and Utilization, and Comorbid Conditions Associated With Hypertension Among US Adults?" American Journal of Hypertension, vol. 21, no. 2, 2008, pp. 159-65.
Ostchega Y, Hughes JP, Wright JD, et al. Are demographic characteristics, health care access and utilization, and comorbid conditions associated with hypertension among US adults? Am J Hypertens. 2008;21(2):159-65.
Ostchega, Y., Hughes, J. P., Wright, J. D., McDowell, M. A., & Louis, T. (2008). Are demographic characteristics, health care access and utilization, and comorbid conditions associated with hypertension among US adults? American Journal of Hypertension, 21(2), 159-65. https://doi.org/10.1038/ajh.2007.32
Ostchega Y, et al. Are Demographic Characteristics, Health Care Access and Utilization, and Comorbid Conditions Associated With Hypertension Among US Adults. Am J Hypertens. 2008;21(2):159-65. PubMed PMID: 18188162.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Are demographic characteristics, health care access and utilization, and comorbid conditions associated with hypertension among US adults? AU - Ostchega,Yechiam, AU - Hughes,Jeffery P, AU - Wright,Jacqueline D, AU - McDowell,Margaret A, AU - Louis,Tatiana, Y1 - 2008/01/10/ PY - 2008/1/12/pubmed PY - 2008/4/25/medline PY - 2008/1/12/entrez SP - 159 EP - 65 JF - American journal of hypertension JO - Am J Hypertens VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Little is known about the factors associated with hypertension awareness, treatment, and control. We examined the association of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, risk factors, health care access and utilization, and hypertension awareness, treatment, and control. METHODS: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2004, a continuous, annual survey of the civilian non-institutionalized US population. The sample comprised 4,816 hypertensive persons aged 20+ years. RESULTS: Adults > or =60 years were more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension compared with adults 40-59 years old (60-69 years old: odds ratio (OR) 1.69, confidence interval (CI) 1.31-2.17; 80+ years old: OR 3.56, CI 2.42-5.25, respectively). Compared to men, women were more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension (OR 1.29, CI 1.01-1.64). When compared with non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks were more likely to have uncontrolled hypertension (OR 1.40, CI 1.10-1.79). Diabetes and Poverty Income Ratio (PIR) classification of <1 were associated with increased likelihood of uncontrolled hypertension (OR 2.69, CI 1.99-3.63; OR 1.68, CI 1.19-2.37; respectively). Persons without health insurance had higher odds of being untreated when compared with insured persons (OR 2.38, CI 1.71-3.32). Younger age (20-39 years), lack of risk factors for hypertension and less health care were associated with increased odds of being unaware of hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Uncontrolled hypertension is more likely among women, older persons (> or =60 years), non-Hispanic blacks, the poor, and diabetics. Hypertension awareness and treatment is lower among the young (20-39 years), the uninsured, individuals reporting fewer health risk factors, and adults with less exposure and utilization of health care. SN - 0895-7061 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18188162/Are_demographic_characteristics_health_care_access_and_utilization_and_comorbid_conditions_associated_with_hypertension_among_US_adults L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajh/article-lookup/doi/10.1038/ajh.2007.32 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -