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Circulating fatty acid profiles in response to three levels of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in horses.
J Anim Sci. 2008 May; 86(5):1114-23.JA

Abstract

Fatty acids of the n-3 type confer health benefits to humans and other species. Their importance to equine physiology could include improved exercise tolerance, decreased inflammation, and improved reproductive function. The circulating fatty acid profile and the acquisition and washout of fatty acids in response to n-3 supplementation were determined for horses in the current study. A fatty acid supplement high in eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid was fed to deliver EPA plus DHA at 0 (control), 10, 20, or 40 g/d to 16 mares (n = 4/group) for 28 d. Plasma was collected at -11, 3, 7, 10, 16, 23, 30, 37, 44, 70, and 87 d relative to the beginning of supplementation. Plasma was analyzed for the presence of 35 fatty acids by gas chromatography. Plasma EPA and DHA increased (P < 0.05) in a dose-responsive manner by 3 d of feeding and reached peak concentrations by 7 d. Peak EPA and DHA concentrations of the 40 g/d supplement group were approximately 13x and 10x those of controls, respectively. Plasma EPA and DHA demonstrated a steep decline (P < 0.05) from peak values by 9 d after cessation of supplementation and were near presupplementation values by 42 d. Omega-3 supplementation also increased (P < 0.05) concentrations of fatty acids C14:0, C17:1n-7, C18:1trans-11, C18:3n-6, C18:4n-3, C20:3n-6, C20:4n-6, and C22:5n-3 and decreased (P < 0.05) concentrations of C18:1cis-9 fatty acid. Seasonal effects, apparently unrelated to supplementation and likely due to the availability of fresh forage, were also noted. Unlike ruminants, there were no detectable concentrations of CLA in equine plasma. These results indicate that the circulating fatty acid milieu in horses can be influenced through targeted supplementation. Possible implications of increased n-3 plasma and tissue concentrations on specific physiological function in the equine remain to be elucidated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Science, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale 62901, USA. sking@siu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18192545

Citation

King, S S., et al. "Circulating Fatty Acid Profiles in Response to Three Levels of Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation in Horses." Journal of Animal Science, vol. 86, no. 5, 2008, pp. 1114-23.
King SS, Abughazaleh AA, Webel SK, et al. Circulating fatty acid profiles in response to three levels of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in horses. J Anim Sci. 2008;86(5):1114-23.
King, S. S., Abughazaleh, A. A., Webel, S. K., & Jones, K. L. (2008). Circulating fatty acid profiles in response to three levels of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in horses. Journal of Animal Science, 86(5), 1114-23. https://doi.org/10.2527/jas.2007-0682
King SS, et al. Circulating Fatty Acid Profiles in Response to Three Levels of Dietary Omega-3 Fatty Acid Supplementation in Horses. J Anim Sci. 2008;86(5):1114-23. PubMed PMID: 18192545.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Circulating fatty acid profiles in response to three levels of dietary omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in horses. AU - King,S S, AU - Abughazaleh,A A, AU - Webel,S K, AU - Jones,K L, Y1 - 2008/01/11/ PY - 2008/1/15/pubmed PY - 2008/7/17/medline PY - 2008/1/15/entrez SP - 1114 EP - 23 JF - Journal of animal science JO - J. Anim. Sci. VL - 86 IS - 5 N2 - Fatty acids of the n-3 type confer health benefits to humans and other species. Their importance to equine physiology could include improved exercise tolerance, decreased inflammation, and improved reproductive function. The circulating fatty acid profile and the acquisition and washout of fatty acids in response to n-3 supplementation were determined for horses in the current study. A fatty acid supplement high in eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid was fed to deliver EPA plus DHA at 0 (control), 10, 20, or 40 g/d to 16 mares (n = 4/group) for 28 d. Plasma was collected at -11, 3, 7, 10, 16, 23, 30, 37, 44, 70, and 87 d relative to the beginning of supplementation. Plasma was analyzed for the presence of 35 fatty acids by gas chromatography. Plasma EPA and DHA increased (P < 0.05) in a dose-responsive manner by 3 d of feeding and reached peak concentrations by 7 d. Peak EPA and DHA concentrations of the 40 g/d supplement group were approximately 13x and 10x those of controls, respectively. Plasma EPA and DHA demonstrated a steep decline (P < 0.05) from peak values by 9 d after cessation of supplementation and were near presupplementation values by 42 d. Omega-3 supplementation also increased (P < 0.05) concentrations of fatty acids C14:0, C17:1n-7, C18:1trans-11, C18:3n-6, C18:4n-3, C20:3n-6, C20:4n-6, and C22:5n-3 and decreased (P < 0.05) concentrations of C18:1cis-9 fatty acid. Seasonal effects, apparently unrelated to supplementation and likely due to the availability of fresh forage, were also noted. Unlike ruminants, there were no detectable concentrations of CLA in equine plasma. These results indicate that the circulating fatty acid milieu in horses can be influenced through targeted supplementation. Possible implications of increased n-3 plasma and tissue concentrations on specific physiological function in the equine remain to be elucidated. SN - 1525-3163 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18192545/Circulating_fatty_acid_profiles_in_response_to_three_levels_of_dietary_omega_3_fatty_acid_supplementation_in_horses_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jas/article-lookup/doi/10.2527/jas.2007-0682 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -