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Vitamins and stroke: the homocysteine hypothesis still in doubt.
Neurologist. 2008 Jan; 14(1):2-4.N

Abstract

During the last years, many epidemiologic studies have identified homocysteine as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases like coronary events, stroke, and venous thromboembolism. Supplementation with oral folate and vitamins B6 and B12 (mainly folate) reduce plasma homocysteine levels to a significant degree. Recent clinical trials showed that vitamin supplementation leads to slower progression or even regression of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid arteries, as confirmed by ultrasonographic measurement of carotid intima media thickness. However, the recent Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) study failed to show any clinical effect on stroke prevention. It is unclear if homocysteine-lowering therapy really has a role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Large trials, which are already conducted, will probably give the definitive answer. In this review, we try to keep pace with the data that make the homocysteine hypothesis still doubtful.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1st Propedeutic Department of Internal Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessalonica, AHEPA Hospital, Salonica, Greece. ntaiosgeorge@yahoo.grNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18195649

Citation

Ntaios, George C., et al. "Vitamins and Stroke: the Homocysteine Hypothesis Still in Doubt." The Neurologist, vol. 14, no. 1, 2008, pp. 2-4.
Ntaios GC, Savopoulos CG, Chatzinikolaou AC, et al. Vitamins and stroke: the homocysteine hypothesis still in doubt. Neurologist. 2008;14(1):2-4.
Ntaios, G. C., Savopoulos, C. G., Chatzinikolaou, A. C., Kaiafa, G. D., & Hatzitolios, A. (2008). Vitamins and stroke: the homocysteine hypothesis still in doubt. The Neurologist, 14(1), 2-4. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.nrl.0000253066.85963.aa
Ntaios GC, et al. Vitamins and Stroke: the Homocysteine Hypothesis Still in Doubt. Neurologist. 2008;14(1):2-4. PubMed PMID: 18195649.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamins and stroke: the homocysteine hypothesis still in doubt. AU - Ntaios,George C, AU - Savopoulos,Christos G, AU - Chatzinikolaou,Anastasia C, AU - Kaiafa,Georgia D, AU - Hatzitolios,Apostolos, PY - 2008/1/16/pubmed PY - 2008/4/12/medline PY - 2008/1/16/entrez SP - 2 EP - 4 JF - The neurologist JO - Neurologist VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - During the last years, many epidemiologic studies have identified homocysteine as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases like coronary events, stroke, and venous thromboembolism. Supplementation with oral folate and vitamins B6 and B12 (mainly folate) reduce plasma homocysteine levels to a significant degree. Recent clinical trials showed that vitamin supplementation leads to slower progression or even regression of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid arteries, as confirmed by ultrasonographic measurement of carotid intima media thickness. However, the recent Vitamin Intervention for Stroke Prevention (VISP) study failed to show any clinical effect on stroke prevention. It is unclear if homocysteine-lowering therapy really has a role in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. Large trials, which are already conducted, will probably give the definitive answer. In this review, we try to keep pace with the data that make the homocysteine hypothesis still doubtful. SN - 1074-7931 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18195649/Vitamins_and_stroke:_the_homocysteine_hypothesis_still_in_doubt_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.nrl.0000253066.85963.aa DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -