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Mediterranean diet and metabolic diseases.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW

The objective of this article is to present evidence illustrating the relationship between Mediterranean diets and metabolic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome, and to briefly discuss potential mechanisms by which these diets can help in disease prevention and treatment.

RECENT FINDINGS

Although the Mediterranean diet has long been celebrated for its impact on cardiovascular health, mounting evidence indicates a favorable effect on obesity and type 2 diabetes, as well. While health promotion strategies aimed at preventing adult obesity are emphasizing components of Mediterranean dietary patterns, a role for Mediterranean diets in attenuating the inflammatory burden associated with type 2 diabetes is also emerging. Moreover, a lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is associated with dietary patterns rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy products, and unsaturated fats. Both epidemiological and interventional studies have revealed a protective effect of the Mediterranean diet against mild chronic inflammation and its metabolic complications.

SUMMARY

Mounting evidence suggests that Mediterranean diets could serve as an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern, which could help fighting diseases that are related to chronic inflammation, including visceral obesity, type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Geriatrics and Metabolic Diseases, Division of Metabolic Diseases, University of Naples SUN, Naples, Italy. dario.giugliano@unina2.it

    Source

    Current opinion in lipidology 19:1 2008 Feb pg 63-8

    MeSH

    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Diet, Mediterranean
    Humans
    Metabolic Syndrome
    Obesity
    Risk Factors

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18196989

    Citation

    Giugliano, Dario, and Katherine Esposito. "Mediterranean Diet and Metabolic Diseases." Current Opinion in Lipidology, vol. 19, no. 1, 2008, pp. 63-8.
    Giugliano D, Esposito K. Mediterranean diet and metabolic diseases. Curr Opin Lipidol. 2008;19(1):63-8.
    Giugliano, D., & Esposito, K. (2008). Mediterranean diet and metabolic diseases. Current Opinion in Lipidology, 19(1), pp. 63-8. doi:10.1097/MOL.0b013e3282f2fa4d.
    Giugliano D, Esposito K. Mediterranean Diet and Metabolic Diseases. Curr Opin Lipidol. 2008;19(1):63-8. PubMed PMID: 18196989.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Mediterranean diet and metabolic diseases. AU - Giugliano,Dario, AU - Esposito,Katherine, PY - 2008/1/17/pubmed PY - 2008/4/9/medline PY - 2008/1/17/entrez SP - 63 EP - 8 JF - Current opinion in lipidology JO - Curr. Opin. Lipidol. VL - 19 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The objective of this article is to present evidence illustrating the relationship between Mediterranean diets and metabolic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome, and to briefly discuss potential mechanisms by which these diets can help in disease prevention and treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the Mediterranean diet has long been celebrated for its impact on cardiovascular health, mounting evidence indicates a favorable effect on obesity and type 2 diabetes, as well. While health promotion strategies aimed at preventing adult obesity are emphasizing components of Mediterranean dietary patterns, a role for Mediterranean diets in attenuating the inflammatory burden associated with type 2 diabetes is also emerging. Moreover, a lower prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is associated with dietary patterns rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, dairy products, and unsaturated fats. Both epidemiological and interventional studies have revealed a protective effect of the Mediterranean diet against mild chronic inflammation and its metabolic complications. SUMMARY: Mounting evidence suggests that Mediterranean diets could serve as an anti-inflammatory dietary pattern, which could help fighting diseases that are related to chronic inflammation, including visceral obesity, type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. SN - 0957-9672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18196989/Mediterranean_diet_and_metabolic_diseases_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=18196989 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -