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Fluid compliance among patients having haemodialysis: can an educational programme make a difference?
J Adv Nurs. 2008 Feb; 61(3):300-6.JA

Abstract

AIM

This paper is a report of a study to examine the effectiveness of a patient education programme on fluid compliance as assessed by interdialytic weight gain, mean predialysis blood pressure and rate of fluid adherence.

BACKGROUND

Patients with end stage renal disease who receive haemodialysis are often non-compliant with their treatment regime, especially adherence to fluid restrictions.

METHOD

An exploratory study was conducted in 2004-05 using a quasi-experimental, single group design to examine the effectiveness of patient education on fluid compliance in a dialysis centre located in a major teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Twenty-six patients with an interdialytic weight gain of greater than 2.5 kg were identified as non-compliant and recruited to the study. The intervention was carried out over a 2-month period and included teaching and weekly reinforcement about diet, fluids and control of weight gain.

FINDINGS

Patients' mean interdialytic weight gain decreased following the educational intervention from 2.64 kg to 2.21 kg (P < 0.05) and adherence to fluid restrictions increased from 47% to 71% following the intervention. Predialysis mean blood pressure did not improve following the intervention, although the maximum recording for predialysis systolic pressure dropped from 220 mmHg to 161 mmHg. Whilst no statistically significant associations were detected between interdialytic weight gain and age, educational level, marital status or employment status, women demonstrated a greater decrease in mean interdialytic weight gain than men.

CONCLUSION

Nephrology nurses often have long-term relationships with their patients and are ideally placed to provide ongoing education and encouragement, especially for those experiencing difficulties in adhering to fluid and dietary restrictions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Churchill, Victoria, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18197864

Citation

Barnett, Tony, et al. "Fluid Compliance Among Patients Having Haemodialysis: Can an Educational Programme Make a Difference?" Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 61, no. 3, 2008, pp. 300-6.
Barnett T, Li Yoong T, Pinikahana J, et al. Fluid compliance among patients having haemodialysis: can an educational programme make a difference? J Adv Nurs. 2008;61(3):300-6.
Barnett, T., Li Yoong, T., Pinikahana, J., & Si-Yen, T. (2008). Fluid compliance among patients having haemodialysis: can an educational programme make a difference? Journal of Advanced Nursing, 61(3), 300-6. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04528.x
Barnett T, et al. Fluid Compliance Among Patients Having Haemodialysis: Can an Educational Programme Make a Difference. J Adv Nurs. 2008;61(3):300-6. PubMed PMID: 18197864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fluid compliance among patients having haemodialysis: can an educational programme make a difference? AU - Barnett,Tony, AU - Li Yoong,Tang, AU - Pinikahana,Jaya, AU - Si-Yen,Tan, PY - 2008/1/17/pubmed PY - 2008/6/3/medline PY - 2008/1/17/entrez SP - 300 EP - 6 JF - Journal of advanced nursing JO - J Adv Nurs VL - 61 IS - 3 N2 - AIM: This paper is a report of a study to examine the effectiveness of a patient education programme on fluid compliance as assessed by interdialytic weight gain, mean predialysis blood pressure and rate of fluid adherence. BACKGROUND: Patients with end stage renal disease who receive haemodialysis are often non-compliant with their treatment regime, especially adherence to fluid restrictions. METHOD: An exploratory study was conducted in 2004-05 using a quasi-experimental, single group design to examine the effectiveness of patient education on fluid compliance in a dialysis centre located in a major teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Twenty-six patients with an interdialytic weight gain of greater than 2.5 kg were identified as non-compliant and recruited to the study. The intervention was carried out over a 2-month period and included teaching and weekly reinforcement about diet, fluids and control of weight gain. FINDINGS: Patients' mean interdialytic weight gain decreased following the educational intervention from 2.64 kg to 2.21 kg (P < 0.05) and adherence to fluid restrictions increased from 47% to 71% following the intervention. Predialysis mean blood pressure did not improve following the intervention, although the maximum recording for predialysis systolic pressure dropped from 220 mmHg to 161 mmHg. Whilst no statistically significant associations were detected between interdialytic weight gain and age, educational level, marital status or employment status, women demonstrated a greater decrease in mean interdialytic weight gain than men. CONCLUSION: Nephrology nurses often have long-term relationships with their patients and are ideally placed to provide ongoing education and encouragement, especially for those experiencing difficulties in adhering to fluid and dietary restrictions. SN - 1365-2648 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18197864/Fluid_compliance_among_patients_having_haemodialysis:_can_an_educational_programme_make_a_difference L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2648.2007.04528.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -