Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Screening cancer patients' families with the distress thermometer (DT): a validation study.
Psychooncology. 2008 Oct; 17(10):959-66.P

Abstract

Although family members of cancer patients are at great risk of experiencing psychological distress, clinical tools to assist with recognizing and intervening with appropriate psychosocial care are sparse. This study reports on the first validation of the distress thermometer (DT) as a screening instrument for symptoms of depression and anxiety in family members of cancer patients. The DT was administered with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in a sample of 321 family members. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) demonstrated that the DT has good diagnostic utility relative to the HADS (area under the curve= 0.88 relative to the HADS anxiety scale; 0.84 relative to the HADS depression scale, respectively). The ROC curves indicate that using a cut-off of 4/5 maximizes sensitivity (86.2% HADS anxiety scale; 88.2% HADS depression scale) and specificity (71.2% HADS anxiety scale; 67.6% HADS depression scale); however, the alternative lower cut-off of 3/4 increases sensitivity (94.1% for both scales) and hence reduces the risk of missing distressed family members (specificity is 62.9% for HADS anxiety scale; 59.1% for HADS depression scale). The results offer validation of the DT for screening family members of cancer patients and support its use for clinical assessment. Distress screening with DT for family members of cancer patients is a promising and efficient approach to integrating family members in the program of care and provides the first step toward meeting their unmet needs with referral for supportive services.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Zurich, Switzerland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Validation Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18203146

Citation

Zwahlen, Diana, et al. "Screening Cancer Patients' Families With the Distress Thermometer (DT): a Validation Study." Psycho-oncology, vol. 17, no. 10, 2008, pp. 959-66.
Zwahlen D, Hagenbuch N, Carley MI, et al. Screening cancer patients' families with the distress thermometer (DT): a validation study. Psychooncology. 2008;17(10):959-66.
Zwahlen, D., Hagenbuch, N., Carley, M. I., Recklitis, C. J., & Buchi, S. (2008). Screening cancer patients' families with the distress thermometer (DT): a validation study. Psycho-oncology, 17(10), 959-66. https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.1320
Zwahlen D, et al. Screening Cancer Patients' Families With the Distress Thermometer (DT): a Validation Study. Psychooncology. 2008;17(10):959-66. PubMed PMID: 18203146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Screening cancer patients' families with the distress thermometer (DT): a validation study. AU - Zwahlen,Diana, AU - Hagenbuch,Niels, AU - Carley,Margaret I, AU - Recklitis,Christopher J, AU - Buchi,Stefan, PY - 2008/1/19/pubmed PY - 2009/3/19/medline PY - 2008/1/19/entrez SP - 959 EP - 66 JF - Psycho-oncology JO - Psychooncology VL - 17 IS - 10 N2 - Although family members of cancer patients are at great risk of experiencing psychological distress, clinical tools to assist with recognizing and intervening with appropriate psychosocial care are sparse. This study reports on the first validation of the distress thermometer (DT) as a screening instrument for symptoms of depression and anxiety in family members of cancer patients. The DT was administered with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in a sample of 321 family members. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) demonstrated that the DT has good diagnostic utility relative to the HADS (area under the curve= 0.88 relative to the HADS anxiety scale; 0.84 relative to the HADS depression scale, respectively). The ROC curves indicate that using a cut-off of 4/5 maximizes sensitivity (86.2% HADS anxiety scale; 88.2% HADS depression scale) and specificity (71.2% HADS anxiety scale; 67.6% HADS depression scale); however, the alternative lower cut-off of 3/4 increases sensitivity (94.1% for both scales) and hence reduces the risk of missing distressed family members (specificity is 62.9% for HADS anxiety scale; 59.1% for HADS depression scale). The results offer validation of the DT for screening family members of cancer patients and support its use for clinical assessment. Distress screening with DT for family members of cancer patients is a promising and efficient approach to integrating family members in the program of care and provides the first step toward meeting their unmet needs with referral for supportive services. SN - 1099-1611 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18203146/Screening_cancer_patients'_families_with_the_distress_thermometer__DT_:_a_validation_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.1320 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -