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Predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in first-episode psychosis: conclusions from a randomized, double-blind, controlled prospective study of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol.
J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008 Feb; 28(1):27-31.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is one of the most distressing adverse effects being observed in recent times. Most studies have been limited by several confounders.

AIM

To evaluate the predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in drug-naive patients with first-episode psychosis treated with olanzapine, risperidone, or haloperidol and compare them with a healthy matched control group.

METHODS

Newly diagnosed patients with first-episode schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic medication-olanzapine, risperidone, or haloperidol-and matched healthy controls were followed for 6 weeks. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and weight changes and proportions of subjects with more than 7% weight gain were calculated. The predictors of weight gain were explored.

RESULTS

Ninety-nine patients with first-episode schizophrenia and 51 healthy controls were examined. Waist circumference (r = -0.25; P < 0.01) and weight (r = -0.24; P < 0.01) at baseline in addition to the disease process (P < 0.001) as well as antipsychotic use (P < 0.001) were associated with greater increases in weight and BMI. Olanzapine (77%) had greater clinically significant weight gain as compared with risperidone (63%) and haloperidol (22%). Lower BMI at baseline and a diagnosis of undifferentiated schizophrenia were associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain.

CONCLUSIONS

The results confirm clinically significant and substantial weight gain induced by antipsychotic treatment in drug-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia and identify several risk factors for weight gain such as lower BMI scores, use of olanzapine, and a diagnosis of undifferentiated schizophrenia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Central Institute of Psychiatry, Ranchi, Jharkhand, India. saddichha@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18204337

Citation

Saddichha, Sahoo, et al. "Predictors of Antipsychotic-induced Weight Gain in First-episode Psychosis: Conclusions From a Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Prospective Study of Olanzapine, Risperidone, and Haloperidol." Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, vol. 28, no. 1, 2008, pp. 27-31.
Saddichha S, Ameen S, Akhtar S. Predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in first-episode psychosis: conclusions from a randomized, double-blind, controlled prospective study of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008;28(1):27-31.
Saddichha, S., Ameen, S., & Akhtar, S. (2008). Predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in first-episode psychosis: conclusions from a randomized, double-blind, controlled prospective study of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 28(1), 27-31. https://doi.org/10.1097/jcp.0b013e3181602fe6
Saddichha S, Ameen S, Akhtar S. Predictors of Antipsychotic-induced Weight Gain in First-episode Psychosis: Conclusions From a Randomized, Double-blind, Controlled Prospective Study of Olanzapine, Risperidone, and Haloperidol. J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2008;28(1):27-31. PubMed PMID: 18204337.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in first-episode psychosis: conclusions from a randomized, double-blind, controlled prospective study of olanzapine, risperidone, and haloperidol. AU - Saddichha,Sahoo, AU - Ameen,Shahul, AU - Akhtar,Sayeed, PY - 2008/1/22/pubmed PY - 2008/3/28/medline PY - 2008/1/22/entrez SP - 27 EP - 31 JF - Journal of clinical psychopharmacology JO - J Clin Psychopharmacol VL - 28 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic-induced weight gain is one of the most distressing adverse effects being observed in recent times. Most studies have been limited by several confounders. AIM: To evaluate the predictors of antipsychotic-induced weight gain in drug-naive patients with first-episode psychosis treated with olanzapine, risperidone, or haloperidol and compare them with a healthy matched control group. METHODS: Newly diagnosed patients with first-episode schizophrenia treated with antipsychotic medication-olanzapine, risperidone, or haloperidol-and matched healthy controls were followed for 6 weeks. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, and weight changes and proportions of subjects with more than 7% weight gain were calculated. The predictors of weight gain were explored. RESULTS: Ninety-nine patients with first-episode schizophrenia and 51 healthy controls were examined. Waist circumference (r = -0.25; P < 0.01) and weight (r = -0.24; P < 0.01) at baseline in addition to the disease process (P < 0.001) as well as antipsychotic use (P < 0.001) were associated with greater increases in weight and BMI. Olanzapine (77%) had greater clinically significant weight gain as compared with risperidone (63%) and haloperidol (22%). Lower BMI at baseline and a diagnosis of undifferentiated schizophrenia were associated with antipsychotic-induced weight gain. CONCLUSIONS: The results confirm clinically significant and substantial weight gain induced by antipsychotic treatment in drug-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia and identify several risk factors for weight gain such as lower BMI scores, use of olanzapine, and a diagnosis of undifferentiated schizophrenia. SN - 0271-0749 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18204337/Predictors_of_antipsychotic_induced_weight_gain_in_first_episode_psychosis:_conclusions_from_a_randomized_double_blind_controlled_prospective_study_of_olanzapine_risperidone_and_haloperidol_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/jcp.0b013e3181602fe6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -