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Intestinal blood loss as an aggravating factor of iron deficiency in infants aged 9 to 12 months fed whole cow's milk.
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2008 Feb; 42(2):152-6.JC

Abstract

GOALS

To verify the occurrence of occult intestinal blood loss and iron deficiency in infants aged 9 to 12 months.

STUDY

A consecutive sample of 98 infants of the Pediatric Public Health Primary Care Unit in the town of Arapongas, Parana State, Brazil was involved in this cross-sectional study. Dietary history, hemoglobin, serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin, and an occult fecal blood loss investigation, by the immune chromatographic method specific for human hemoglobin were performed.

RESULTS

Presence of occult intestinal blood occurred in 8/23 of the breast-fed (plus complementary feed) infants and in 30/64 of the infants who were fed with cow's milk (plus complementary feed) (P=0.449). The comparison of body iron indicators in accordance to positive or negative occult fecal blood, did not show any significant difference in the 23 breast-fed infants. Serum ferritin (median=4.2 ng/mL) was significantly lower (P=0.004) in infants who received whole cow's milk and had positive occult fecal blood, than in those infants who received whole cow's milk but were without occult fecal blood (median=12.1 ng/mL).

CONCLUSIONS

In breast-fed infants with negative occult fecal blood, iron deficiency severity is not greater than in those with positive results. In infants fed whole cow's milk, occult fecal blood loss is an aggravating factor of iron deficiency.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Federal University of Sao Paulo/Paulista School of Medicine, Sao Paulo, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18209584

Citation

Fernandes, Sandra Maria Rodrigues, et al. "Intestinal Blood Loss as an Aggravating Factor of Iron Deficiency in Infants Aged 9 to 12 Months Fed Whole Cow's Milk." Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 42, no. 2, 2008, pp. 152-6.
Fernandes SM, de Morais MB, Amancio OM. Intestinal blood loss as an aggravating factor of iron deficiency in infants aged 9 to 12 months fed whole cow's milk. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2008;42(2):152-6.
Fernandes, S. M., de Morais, M. B., & Amancio, O. M. (2008). Intestinal blood loss as an aggravating factor of iron deficiency in infants aged 9 to 12 months fed whole cow's milk. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 42(2), 152-6. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.mcg.0000248007.62773.3a
Fernandes SM, de Morais MB, Amancio OM. Intestinal Blood Loss as an Aggravating Factor of Iron Deficiency in Infants Aged 9 to 12 Months Fed Whole Cow's Milk. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2008;42(2):152-6. PubMed PMID: 18209584.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intestinal blood loss as an aggravating factor of iron deficiency in infants aged 9 to 12 months fed whole cow's milk. AU - Fernandes,Sandra Maria Rodrigues, AU - de Morais,Mauro Batista, AU - Amancio,Olga Maria Silverio, PY - 2008/1/23/pubmed PY - 2008/4/2/medline PY - 2008/1/23/entrez SP - 152 EP - 6 JF - Journal of clinical gastroenterology JO - J. Clin. Gastroenterol. VL - 42 IS - 2 N2 - GOALS: To verify the occurrence of occult intestinal blood loss and iron deficiency in infants aged 9 to 12 months. STUDY: A consecutive sample of 98 infants of the Pediatric Public Health Primary Care Unit in the town of Arapongas, Parana State, Brazil was involved in this cross-sectional study. Dietary history, hemoglobin, serum iron, transferrin saturation, ferritin, and an occult fecal blood loss investigation, by the immune chromatographic method specific for human hemoglobin were performed. RESULTS: Presence of occult intestinal blood occurred in 8/23 of the breast-fed (plus complementary feed) infants and in 30/64 of the infants who were fed with cow's milk (plus complementary feed) (P=0.449). The comparison of body iron indicators in accordance to positive or negative occult fecal blood, did not show any significant difference in the 23 breast-fed infants. Serum ferritin (median=4.2 ng/mL) was significantly lower (P=0.004) in infants who received whole cow's milk and had positive occult fecal blood, than in those infants who received whole cow's milk but were without occult fecal blood (median=12.1 ng/mL). CONCLUSIONS: In breast-fed infants with negative occult fecal blood, iron deficiency severity is not greater than in those with positive results. In infants fed whole cow's milk, occult fecal blood loss is an aggravating factor of iron deficiency. SN - 0192-0790 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18209584/Intestinal_blood_loss_as_an_aggravating_factor_of_iron_deficiency_in_infants_aged_9_to_12_months_fed_whole_cow's_milk_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.mcg.0000248007.62773.3a DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -