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I want to be creative: exploring the role of hedonic contingency theory in the positive mood-cognitive flexibility link.
J Pers Soc Psychol 2008; 94(2):214-30JP

Abstract

Three studies explored the role of hedonic contingency theory as an explanation for the link between positive mood and cognitive flexibility. Study 1 examined the determinants of activity choice for participants in happy, sad, or neutral moods. Consistent with hedonic contingency theory, happy participants weighted potential for creativity as well as the pleasantness of the task more heavily in their preference ratings. In Study 2, participants were given either a neutral or mood-threatening item generation task to perform. Results illustrated that happy participants exhibited greater cognitive flexibility in all cases; when confronted with a potentially mood-threatening task, happy participants were able to creatively transform the task so as to maintain positive mood and interest. Finally, Study 3 manipulated participants' beliefs that moods could or could not be altered. Results replicated the standard positive mood-increased cognitive flexibility effect in the nonmood-freezing condition, but no effects of mood on creativity were found in the mood-freezing condition. These studies indicate that the hedonic contingency theory may be an important contributing mechanism behind the positive mood-cognitive flexibility link.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405-7007, USA. ehirt@indiana.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18211173

Citation

Hirt, Edward R., et al. "I Want to Be Creative: Exploring the Role of Hedonic Contingency Theory in the Positive Mood-cognitive Flexibility Link." Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, vol. 94, no. 2, 2008, pp. 214-30.
Hirt ER, Devers EE, McCrea SM. I want to be creative: exploring the role of hedonic contingency theory in the positive mood-cognitive flexibility link. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2008;94(2):214-30.
Hirt, E. R., Devers, E. E., & McCrea, S. M. (2008). I want to be creative: exploring the role of hedonic contingency theory in the positive mood-cognitive flexibility link. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94(2), pp. 214-30. doi:10.1037/0022-3514.94.2.94.2.214.
Hirt ER, Devers EE, McCrea SM. I Want to Be Creative: Exploring the Role of Hedonic Contingency Theory in the Positive Mood-cognitive Flexibility Link. J Pers Soc Psychol. 2008;94(2):214-30. PubMed PMID: 18211173.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - I want to be creative: exploring the role of hedonic contingency theory in the positive mood-cognitive flexibility link. AU - Hirt,Edward R, AU - Devers,Erin E, AU - McCrea,Sean M, PY - 2008/1/24/pubmed PY - 2008/4/3/medline PY - 2008/1/24/entrez SP - 214 EP - 30 JF - Journal of personality and social psychology JO - J Pers Soc Psychol VL - 94 IS - 2 N2 - Three studies explored the role of hedonic contingency theory as an explanation for the link between positive mood and cognitive flexibility. Study 1 examined the determinants of activity choice for participants in happy, sad, or neutral moods. Consistent with hedonic contingency theory, happy participants weighted potential for creativity as well as the pleasantness of the task more heavily in their preference ratings. In Study 2, participants were given either a neutral or mood-threatening item generation task to perform. Results illustrated that happy participants exhibited greater cognitive flexibility in all cases; when confronted with a potentially mood-threatening task, happy participants were able to creatively transform the task so as to maintain positive mood and interest. Finally, Study 3 manipulated participants' beliefs that moods could or could not be altered. Results replicated the standard positive mood-increased cognitive flexibility effect in the nonmood-freezing condition, but no effects of mood on creativity were found in the mood-freezing condition. These studies indicate that the hedonic contingency theory may be an important contributing mechanism behind the positive mood-cognitive flexibility link. SN - 0022-3514 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18211173/I_want_to_be_creative:_exploring_the_role_of_hedonic_contingency_theory_in_the_positive_mood_cognitive_flexibility_link_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/psp/94/2/214 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -