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Prenatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status: the importance of a balanced intake of docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid.
J Perinat Med. 2008; 36(2):101-9.JP

Abstract

This review addresses the effect of prenatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status on neurodevelopmental outcome. It focuses on the major LPCUFA doxosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6omega3) and arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4omega6). Due to enzymatic competition high DHA intake results in lower tissue levels of AA. LCPUFA accumulation in the brain starts early and increases during the third trimester. Initially brain AA-accretion exceeds DHA-accretion; after term age DHA-accretion surpasses AA-accretion. Animal studies indicated that early omega3-depletion results in poorer developmental outcome. They also showed that early omega3-supplementation had no effect on cognitive outcome, promotes visual development and impairs auditory and motor development. Only limited human data are available. Correlational studies suggest that neonatal AA status shows a positive relation with early neurodevelopmental outcome and that neonatal DHA status also might be correlated with improved outcome beyond infancy. Results of human intervention studies are equivocal: most studies were unable to demonstrate a positive effect of prenatal omega3-supplementation. It is concluded that only limited evidence exists to support the notion that prenatal omega3-supplementation favours developmental outcome. Caution is warranted for an unbalanced high DHA intake during the first two trimesters of pregnancy, i.e., DHA without additional AA supplementation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics - Developmental Neurology, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands. m.hadders-algra@med.umcg.nl

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18211254

Citation

Hadders-Algra, Mijna. "Prenatal Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Status: the Importance of a Balanced Intake of Docosahexaenoic Acid and Arachidonic Acid." Journal of Perinatal Medicine, vol. 36, no. 2, 2008, pp. 101-9.
Hadders-Algra M. Prenatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status: the importance of a balanced intake of docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid. J Perinat Med. 2008;36(2):101-9.
Hadders-Algra, M. (2008). Prenatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status: the importance of a balanced intake of docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid. Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 36(2), 101-9. https://doi.org/10.1515/JPM.2008.029
Hadders-Algra M. Prenatal Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Status: the Importance of a Balanced Intake of Docosahexaenoic Acid and Arachidonic Acid. J Perinat Med. 2008;36(2):101-9. PubMed PMID: 18211254.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid status: the importance of a balanced intake of docosahexaenoic acid and arachidonic acid. A1 - Hadders-Algra,Mijna, PY - 2008/1/24/pubmed PY - 2008/7/4/medline PY - 2008/1/24/entrez SP - 101 EP - 9 JF - Journal of perinatal medicine JO - J Perinat Med VL - 36 IS - 2 N2 - This review addresses the effect of prenatal long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA) status on neurodevelopmental outcome. It focuses on the major LPCUFA doxosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6omega3) and arachidonic acid (AA; 20:4omega6). Due to enzymatic competition high DHA intake results in lower tissue levels of AA. LCPUFA accumulation in the brain starts early and increases during the third trimester. Initially brain AA-accretion exceeds DHA-accretion; after term age DHA-accretion surpasses AA-accretion. Animal studies indicated that early omega3-depletion results in poorer developmental outcome. They also showed that early omega3-supplementation had no effect on cognitive outcome, promotes visual development and impairs auditory and motor development. Only limited human data are available. Correlational studies suggest that neonatal AA status shows a positive relation with early neurodevelopmental outcome and that neonatal DHA status also might be correlated with improved outcome beyond infancy. Results of human intervention studies are equivocal: most studies were unable to demonstrate a positive effect of prenatal omega3-supplementation. It is concluded that only limited evidence exists to support the notion that prenatal omega3-supplementation favours developmental outcome. Caution is warranted for an unbalanced high DHA intake during the first two trimesters of pregnancy, i.e., DHA without additional AA supplementation. SN - 0300-5577 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18211254/Prenatal_long_chain_polyunsaturated_fatty_acid_status:_the_importance_of_a_balanced_intake_of_docosahexaenoic_acid_and_arachidonic_acid_ L2 - https://www.degruyter.com/doi/10.1515/JPM.2008.029 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -