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Caffeine, alcohol, smoking, and the risk of incident epithelial ovarian cancer.
Cancer 2008; 112(5):1169-77C

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Smoking, caffeine, and alcohol intake are all potentially modifiable factors that have an unclear association with ovarian cancer risk. Therefore, the associations between these exposures and ovarian cancer risk were prospectively examined among 110,454 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) for the smoking analyses and 80,253 women for the dietary analyses.

METHODS

Women completed biennial questionnaires assessing ovarian cancer risk factors beginning in 1976, with food frequency questionnaires administered every 2 to 4 years starting in 1980. For the smoking analyses, 737 confirmed cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were identified and for the dietary aims, 507 cases were identified through June 1, 2004.

RESULTS

Compared with never-smokers, neither current nor past smoking was associated with ovarian cancer risk overall; however, both were associated with mucinous tumors (n = 69; rate ratio [RR], past = 2.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15-3.55]; RR, current = 2.22 [95% CI, 1.16-4.24]). A modest inverse association between caffeine intake and ovarian cancer risk was observed (RR, top vs bottom quintile = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.60-1.07 [P = .03]), which was strongest for women who had never used either oral contraceptives (RR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.46-0.92 [P for heterogeneity = .02]) or postmenopausal hormones (RR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.36-0.91 [P for heterogeneity = .13]). Alcohol was not associated with ovarian cancer risk.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of the current study suggest that cigarette smoking may only increase the risk for mucinous ovarian tumors, and alcohol intake was not associated with risk. However, an inverse association was observed between caffeine intake and ovarian cancer risk, particularly in women not using hormones; this finding merits further study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. nhsst@channing.harvard.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18213613

Citation

Tworoger, Shelley S., et al. "Caffeine, Alcohol, Smoking, and the Risk of Incident Epithelial Ovarian Cancer." Cancer, vol. 112, no. 5, 2008, pp. 1169-77.
Tworoger SS, Gertig DM, Gates MA, et al. Caffeine, alcohol, smoking, and the risk of incident epithelial ovarian cancer. Cancer. 2008;112(5):1169-77.
Tworoger, S. S., Gertig, D. M., Gates, M. A., Hecht, J. L., & Hankinson, S. E. (2008). Caffeine, alcohol, smoking, and the risk of incident epithelial ovarian cancer. Cancer, 112(5), pp. 1169-77. doi:10.1002/cncr.23275.
Tworoger SS, et al. Caffeine, Alcohol, Smoking, and the Risk of Incident Epithelial Ovarian Cancer. Cancer. 2008 Mar 1;112(5):1169-77. PubMed PMID: 18213613.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Caffeine, alcohol, smoking, and the risk of incident epithelial ovarian cancer. AU - Tworoger,Shelley S, AU - Gertig,Dorota M, AU - Gates,Margaret A, AU - Hecht,Jonathan L, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, PY - 2008/1/24/pubmed PY - 2008/3/28/medline PY - 2008/1/24/entrez SP - 1169 EP - 77 JF - Cancer JO - Cancer VL - 112 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Smoking, caffeine, and alcohol intake are all potentially modifiable factors that have an unclear association with ovarian cancer risk. Therefore, the associations between these exposures and ovarian cancer risk were prospectively examined among 110,454 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) for the smoking analyses and 80,253 women for the dietary analyses. METHODS: Women completed biennial questionnaires assessing ovarian cancer risk factors beginning in 1976, with food frequency questionnaires administered every 2 to 4 years starting in 1980. For the smoking analyses, 737 confirmed cases of epithelial ovarian cancer were identified and for the dietary aims, 507 cases were identified through June 1, 2004. RESULTS: Compared with never-smokers, neither current nor past smoking was associated with ovarian cancer risk overall; however, both were associated with mucinous tumors (n = 69; rate ratio [RR], past = 2.02 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.15-3.55]; RR, current = 2.22 [95% CI, 1.16-4.24]). A modest inverse association between caffeine intake and ovarian cancer risk was observed (RR, top vs bottom quintile = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.60-1.07 [P = .03]), which was strongest for women who had never used either oral contraceptives (RR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.46-0.92 [P for heterogeneity = .02]) or postmenopausal hormones (RR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.36-0.91 [P for heterogeneity = .13]). Alcohol was not associated with ovarian cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study suggest that cigarette smoking may only increase the risk for mucinous ovarian tumors, and alcohol intake was not associated with risk. However, an inverse association was observed between caffeine intake and ovarian cancer risk, particularly in women not using hormones; this finding merits further study. SN - 0008-543X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18213613/Caffeine_alcohol_smoking_and_the_risk_of_incident_epithelial_ovarian_cancer_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23275 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -