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Hospitalisations for sport-related concussions in US children aged 5 to 18 years during 2000-2004.
Br J Sports Med. 2008 Aug; 42(8):664-9.BJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To describe patient and hospital characteristics associated with hospitalisation for a diagnosis of non-fatal sport-related concussion, and to determine factors associated with these hospitalisations.

METHODS

Children aged 5-18 years with a primary diagnosis of a sport-related concussion in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000-2004) were identified. Length of stay and hospital charges for sport-related concussions were documented. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of patient or hospital characteristics with hospitalisations for sport-related concussion.

RESULTS

Between 2000 and 2004, a total of 755 non-fatal paediatric sport-related hospitalisations for concussion were identified. Nationwide, this represents 3712 hospitalisations and over US$29 million total hospital charges, with nearly US$6 million in total hospital charges per year. Over half (52.3%) of patients with concussion experienced loss of consciousness. Over 80% of the patients hospitalised for concussion received no procedures during their average 1.1 day (median 0.8 day) of hospital stay. Older age, but not gender, was associated with increased odds of sport-related hospitalisations for concussion. Non-teaching hospitals or hospitals in rural areas had significantly greater odds of admitting sport-related concussions versus other sport-related traumatic brain injuries compared with teaching or urban hospitals.

CONCLUSIONS

Management of paediatric sport-related concussions varied, depending on the patient and the hospital. Better guidelines are needed for the identification and management of sport-related concussions. Standardised procedures for hospitals treating concussive injuries may also be warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community and Behavioral Health, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, 200 Hawkins Drive, E236 GH, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA. jingzhen-yang@uiowa.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18216159

Citation

Yang, J, et al. "Hospitalisations for Sport-related Concussions in US Children Aged 5 to 18 Years During 2000-2004." British Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 42, no. 8, 2008, pp. 664-9.
Yang J, Phillips G, Xiang H, et al. Hospitalisations for sport-related concussions in US children aged 5 to 18 years during 2000-2004. Br J Sports Med. 2008;42(8):664-9.
Yang, J., Phillips, G., Xiang, H., Allareddy, V., Heiden, E., & Peek-Asa, C. (2008). Hospitalisations for sport-related concussions in US children aged 5 to 18 years during 2000-2004. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 42(8), 664-9. https://doi.org/10.1136/bjsm.2007.040923
Yang J, et al. Hospitalisations for Sport-related Concussions in US Children Aged 5 to 18 Years During 2000-2004. Br J Sports Med. 2008;42(8):664-9. PubMed PMID: 18216159.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hospitalisations for sport-related concussions in US children aged 5 to 18 years during 2000-2004. AU - Yang,J, AU - Phillips,G, AU - Xiang,H, AU - Allareddy,V, AU - Heiden,E, AU - Peek-Asa,C, Y1 - 2008/01/23/ PY - 2008/1/25/pubmed PY - 2008/8/30/medline PY - 2008/1/25/entrez SP - 664 EP - 9 JF - British journal of sports medicine JO - Br J Sports Med VL - 42 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To describe patient and hospital characteristics associated with hospitalisation for a diagnosis of non-fatal sport-related concussion, and to determine factors associated with these hospitalisations. METHODS: Children aged 5-18 years with a primary diagnosis of a sport-related concussion in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2000-2004) were identified. Length of stay and hospital charges for sport-related concussions were documented. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of patient or hospital characteristics with hospitalisations for sport-related concussion. RESULTS: Between 2000 and 2004, a total of 755 non-fatal paediatric sport-related hospitalisations for concussion were identified. Nationwide, this represents 3712 hospitalisations and over US$29 million total hospital charges, with nearly US$6 million in total hospital charges per year. Over half (52.3%) of patients with concussion experienced loss of consciousness. Over 80% of the patients hospitalised for concussion received no procedures during their average 1.1 day (median 0.8 day) of hospital stay. Older age, but not gender, was associated with increased odds of sport-related hospitalisations for concussion. Non-teaching hospitals or hospitals in rural areas had significantly greater odds of admitting sport-related concussions versus other sport-related traumatic brain injuries compared with teaching or urban hospitals. CONCLUSIONS: Management of paediatric sport-related concussions varied, depending on the patient and the hospital. Better guidelines are needed for the identification and management of sport-related concussions. Standardised procedures for hospitals treating concussive injuries may also be warranted. SN - 1473-0480 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18216159/Hospitalisations_for_sport_related_concussions_in_US_children_aged_5_to_18_years_during_2000_2004_ L2 - https://bjsm.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=18216159 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -