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Associations between serum lipids and causes of mortality in a cohort of 3,499 urban Thais: The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) study.
Angiology. 2007 Dec-2008 Jan; 58(6):757-63.A

Abstract

The association between serum lipids and mortality has not previously been established in Thailand. Baseline data from the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) cohort study, plus a resurvey of the cohort 15 years later were analyzed. Participants were employees of EGAT: 2,702 men and 797 women. Total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) were taken as predictive variables; age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and body mass index were taken as confounders. Dependent variables were all-causes and specific causes of mortality over 17 years of follow-up. The major cause of death among men was cardiovascular disease (CVD); among women, it was cancer. Relative risks (RR) for specific causes of death, for a mmol/L increase in each lipid, were estimated after adjustment for confounding factors using Cox proportional hazards regression. TC and LDL-C were negatively associated with liver cirrhosis mortality, although it was likely that the low cholesterol concentration was a consequence of the disease. HDL-C was negatively associated with CVD mortality (RR = 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-0.93), coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality (RR = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.17-0.75) and all cause-mortality (RR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54-0.87). TG was not associated with mortality. HDL-C is an important risk factor for CVD in middle-class urban Thais. Health promotion programs to improve lipid profiles, such as effective exercise campaigns and dietary advice, are required to increase HDL-C and to help prevent CVD and premature death in Thailand.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. rapst@mahidol.ac.thNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18216384

Citation

Sritara, Piyamitr, et al. "Associations Between Serum Lipids and Causes of Mortality in a Cohort of 3,499 Urban Thais: the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) Study." Angiology, vol. 58, no. 6, 2008, pp. 757-63.
Sritara P, Patoomanunt P, Woodward M, et al. Associations between serum lipids and causes of mortality in a cohort of 3,499 urban Thais: The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) study. Angiology. 2008;58(6):757-63.
Sritara, P., Patoomanunt, P., Woodward, M., Narksawat, K., Tulyadachanon, S., Ratanachaiwong, W., Sritara, C., Barzi, F., Yamwong, S., & Tanomsup, S. (2008). Associations between serum lipids and causes of mortality in a cohort of 3,499 urban Thais: The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) study. Angiology, 58(6), 757-63. https://doi.org/10.1177/0003319707304042
Sritara P, et al. Associations Between Serum Lipids and Causes of Mortality in a Cohort of 3,499 Urban Thais: the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) Study. Angiology. 2007 Dec-2008 Jan;58(6):757-63. PubMed PMID: 18216384.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Associations between serum lipids and causes of mortality in a cohort of 3,499 urban Thais: The Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) study. AU - Sritara,Piyamitr, AU - Patoomanunt,Prisana, AU - Woodward,Mark, AU - Narksawat,Kulaya, AU - Tulyadachanon,Supoj, AU - Ratanachaiwong,Wipa, AU - Sritara,Chanika, AU - Barzi,Federica, AU - Yamwong,Sukit, AU - Tanomsup,Supachai, PY - 2008/1/25/pubmed PY - 2008/2/8/medline PY - 2008/1/25/entrez SP - 757 EP - 63 JF - Angiology JO - Angiology VL - 58 IS - 6 N2 - The association between serum lipids and mortality has not previously been established in Thailand. Baseline data from the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) cohort study, plus a resurvey of the cohort 15 years later were analyzed. Participants were employees of EGAT: 2,702 men and 797 women. Total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) were taken as predictive variables; age, sex, hypertension, diabetes, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking, and body mass index were taken as confounders. Dependent variables were all-causes and specific causes of mortality over 17 years of follow-up. The major cause of death among men was cardiovascular disease (CVD); among women, it was cancer. Relative risks (RR) for specific causes of death, for a mmol/L increase in each lipid, were estimated after adjustment for confounding factors using Cox proportional hazards regression. TC and LDL-C were negatively associated with liver cirrhosis mortality, although it was likely that the low cholesterol concentration was a consequence of the disease. HDL-C was negatively associated with CVD mortality (RR = 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39-0.93), coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality (RR = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.17-0.75) and all cause-mortality (RR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.54-0.87). TG was not associated with mortality. HDL-C is an important risk factor for CVD in middle-class urban Thais. Health promotion programs to improve lipid profiles, such as effective exercise campaigns and dietary advice, are required to increase HDL-C and to help prevent CVD and premature death in Thailand. SN - 0003-3197 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18216384/Associations_between_serum_lipids_and_causes_of_mortality_in_a_cohort_of_3499_urban_Thais:_The_Electricity_Generating_Authority_of_Thailand__EGAT__study_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0003319707304042?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -