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Platelet lipoprotein interplay: trigger of foam cell formation and driver of atherosclerosis.
Cardiovasc Res. 2008 Apr 01; 78(1):8-17.CR

Abstract

In the last decade, it was recognized that platelets and lipoproteins play a pivotal role in both early and late atherogenesis. Beside cellular interactions of platelets with other blood cells and vascular cells, interactions with lipoproteins seem to be quite important. Lipoproteins are fundamental 'players' in atherogenesis since they change the properties of different cells involved in atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Several studies have already shown that low density lipoproteins (LDL) are involved in the initiation of platelet signalling pathways. Platelets of hypercholesterolemic patients show hyperaggregability in vitro and enhanced activity in vivo. This review elucidates the major aspects concerning how native and modified lipoproteins influence the activation and metabolic behaviour of platelets, and shows a new way by which platelet-mediated lipoprotein transfer might contribute to foam cell formation. In hyperlipidaemia, circulating platelets are activated. This is accompanied by increased platelet aggregation, platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation, and platelet-induced superoxide anion production. Furthermore, oxidized LDL induces monocyte adhesion to the endothelium, migration and proliferation of smooth muscle cells, injures cells, interferes with nitric oxide release, and promotes procoagulant properties of vascular cells. New data about platelet-mediated lipoprotein transport and consequent foam cell formation, however, provide proof of how platelets might contribute to atheromatous lesion formation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medizinische Klinik III, Kardiologie und Kreislauferkrankungen, Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Otfried-Müller Str. 10, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany. dorothea.axel@med.uni-tuebingen.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18218686

Citation

Siegel-Axel, Dorothea, et al. "Platelet Lipoprotein Interplay: Trigger of Foam Cell Formation and Driver of Atherosclerosis." Cardiovascular Research, vol. 78, no. 1, 2008, pp. 8-17.
Siegel-Axel D, Daub K, Seizer P, et al. Platelet lipoprotein interplay: trigger of foam cell formation and driver of atherosclerosis. Cardiovasc Res. 2008;78(1):8-17.
Siegel-Axel, D., Daub, K., Seizer, P., Lindemann, S., & Gawaz, M. (2008). Platelet lipoprotein interplay: trigger of foam cell formation and driver of atherosclerosis. Cardiovascular Research, 78(1), 8-17. https://doi.org/10.1093/cvr/cvn015
Siegel-Axel D, et al. Platelet Lipoprotein Interplay: Trigger of Foam Cell Formation and Driver of Atherosclerosis. Cardiovasc Res. 2008 Apr 1;78(1):8-17. PubMed PMID: 18218686.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Platelet lipoprotein interplay: trigger of foam cell formation and driver of atherosclerosis. AU - Siegel-Axel,Dorothea, AU - Daub,Karin, AU - Seizer,Peter, AU - Lindemann,Stephan, AU - Gawaz,Meinrad, Y1 - 2008/01/24/ PY - 2008/1/26/pubmed PY - 2008/9/9/medline PY - 2008/1/26/entrez SP - 8 EP - 17 JF - Cardiovascular research JO - Cardiovasc Res VL - 78 IS - 1 N2 - In the last decade, it was recognized that platelets and lipoproteins play a pivotal role in both early and late atherogenesis. Beside cellular interactions of platelets with other blood cells and vascular cells, interactions with lipoproteins seem to be quite important. Lipoproteins are fundamental 'players' in atherogenesis since they change the properties of different cells involved in atherosclerosis and thrombosis. Several studies have already shown that low density lipoproteins (LDL) are involved in the initiation of platelet signalling pathways. Platelets of hypercholesterolemic patients show hyperaggregability in vitro and enhanced activity in vivo. This review elucidates the major aspects concerning how native and modified lipoproteins influence the activation and metabolic behaviour of platelets, and shows a new way by which platelet-mediated lipoprotein transfer might contribute to foam cell formation. In hyperlipidaemia, circulating platelets are activated. This is accompanied by increased platelet aggregation, platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation, and platelet-induced superoxide anion production. Furthermore, oxidized LDL induces monocyte adhesion to the endothelium, migration and proliferation of smooth muscle cells, injures cells, interferes with nitric oxide release, and promotes procoagulant properties of vascular cells. New data about platelet-mediated lipoprotein transport and consequent foam cell formation, however, provide proof of how platelets might contribute to atheromatous lesion formation. SN - 0008-6363 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18218686/Platelet_lipoprotein_interplay:_trigger_of_foam_cell_formation_and_driver_of_atherosclerosis_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cardiovascres/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/cvr/cvn015 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -