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Adiponectin and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Jan; 16(1):172-8.O

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Hypoadiponectinemia is an important risk factor for metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, little is known about its role in the Chinese population. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between plasma adiponectin levels and MetS in middle-aged and elderly Chinese from both urban and rural areas of northern and southern China.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES

This population-based cross-sectional study included 3,193 subjects aged 50-70 from urban and rural areas of Beijing (northern China) and Shanghai (southern China). Plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using a high-throughput micro-assay, Luminex. MetS was identified with the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) criteria.

RESULTS

Adiponectin levels were significantly higher in female, and rural subjects than in male or urban residents (P < 0.001). The prevalence and the number of MetS components progressively increased with declined adiponectin levels (P for trend <0.001). The participants in the lowest adiponectin quartile had a significantly increased risk for acquiring MetS (odds ratio (OR) 3.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.56-4.46) after adjustment for potential confounders. Subjects from Beijing or rural areas had a higher risk for MetS at the same given level of adiponectin than did their Shanghai or urban counterparts, respectively.

DISCUSSION

Adiponectin is negatively associated with MetS in the middle-aged and elderly Chinese independent of known confounders such as BMI, physical activity and life habits. The urban-rural and northern-southern differences in susceptibility to MetS should be taken into consideration for the early detection and prevention of MetS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Systems Biology, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18223631

Citation

Wang, Jing, et al. "Adiponectin and Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-aged and Elderly Chinese." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 16, no. 1, 2008, pp. 172-8.
Wang J, Li H, Franco OH, et al. Adiponectin and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008;16(1):172-8.
Wang, J., Li, H., Franco, O. H., Yu, Z., Liu, Y., & Lin, X. (2008). Adiponectin and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 16(1), 172-8. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.42
Wang J, et al. Adiponectin and Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-aged and Elderly Chinese. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008;16(1):172-8. PubMed PMID: 18223631.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adiponectin and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese. AU - Wang,Jing, AU - Li,Huaixing, AU - Franco,Oscar H, AU - Yu,Zhijie, AU - Liu,Yong, AU - Lin,Xu, PY - 2008/1/29/pubmed PY - 2008/4/9/medline PY - 2008/1/29/entrez SP - 172 EP - 8 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Hypoadiponectinemia is an important risk factor for metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, little is known about its role in the Chinese population. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between plasma adiponectin levels and MetS in middle-aged and elderly Chinese from both urban and rural areas of northern and southern China. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This population-based cross-sectional study included 3,193 subjects aged 50-70 from urban and rural areas of Beijing (northern China) and Shanghai (southern China). Plasma adiponectin concentrations were measured using a high-throughput micro-assay, Luminex. MetS was identified with the updated National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) criteria. RESULTS: Adiponectin levels were significantly higher in female, and rural subjects than in male or urban residents (P < 0.001). The prevalence and the number of MetS components progressively increased with declined adiponectin levels (P for trend <0.001). The participants in the lowest adiponectin quartile had a significantly increased risk for acquiring MetS (odds ratio (OR) 3.38, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.56-4.46) after adjustment for potential confounders. Subjects from Beijing or rural areas had a higher risk for MetS at the same given level of adiponectin than did their Shanghai or urban counterparts, respectively. DISCUSSION: Adiponectin is negatively associated with MetS in the middle-aged and elderly Chinese independent of known confounders such as BMI, physical activity and life habits. The urban-rural and northern-southern differences in susceptibility to MetS should be taken into consideration for the early detection and prevention of MetS. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18223631/Adiponectin_and_metabolic_syndrome_in_middle_aged_and_elderly_Chinese_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.42 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -