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Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of hypopharyngeal/laryngeal and lung cancers: a multicentric case-control study from India.
Int J Epidemiol 2008; 37(2):321-8IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A recent monograph by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has identified indoor air pollution from coal usage as a known human carcinogen, while that from biomass as a probable human carcinogen. Although as much as 74% of the Indian population relies on solid fuels for cooking, very little information is available on cancer risk associated with these fuels in India.

METHODS

Using data from a multicentric case-control study of 799 lung and 1062 hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer cases, and 718 controls, we investigated indoor air pollution from various solid fuels as risk factors for these cancers in India.

RESULTS

Compared with never users, individuals who always used coal had an increased risk of lung cancer [odds ratio (OR) 3.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.64-8.63]. Long duration of coal usage (>50 years) was a risk factor for hypopharyngeal (OR 3.47, CI 0.95-12.69) and laryngeal (OR 3.65, CI 1.11-11.93) cancers. An increased risk of hypopharyngeal cancer was observed among lifelong users of wood (OR 1.62, CI 1.14-2.32), however this was less apparent among never-smokers. Increasing level of smokiness inside the home was associated with an increasing risk of hypopharyngeal and lung cancer (P(trend) < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

This study showed differential risks associated with indoor air pollution from wood and coal burning, and provides novel evidence on cancer risks associated with solid fuel usage in India. Our findings suggest that reducing indoor air pollution from solid fuels may contribute to prevention of these cancers in India, in addition to tobacco and alcohol control programs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18234740

Citation

Sapkota, Amir, et al. "Indoor Air Pollution From Solid Fuels and Risk of Hypopharyngeal/laryngeal and Lung Cancers: a Multicentric Case-control Study From India." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 37, no. 2, 2008, pp. 321-8.
Sapkota A, Gajalakshmi V, Jetly DH, et al. Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of hypopharyngeal/laryngeal and lung cancers: a multicentric case-control study from India. Int J Epidemiol. 2008;37(2):321-8.
Sapkota, A., Gajalakshmi, V., Jetly, D. H., Roychowdhury, S., Dikshit, R. P., Brennan, P., ... Boffetta, P. (2008). Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of hypopharyngeal/laryngeal and lung cancers: a multicentric case-control study from India. International Journal of Epidemiology, 37(2), pp. 321-8. doi:10.1093/ije/dym261.
Sapkota A, et al. Indoor Air Pollution From Solid Fuels and Risk of Hypopharyngeal/laryngeal and Lung Cancers: a Multicentric Case-control Study From India. Int J Epidemiol. 2008;37(2):321-8. PubMed PMID: 18234740.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Indoor air pollution from solid fuels and risk of hypopharyngeal/laryngeal and lung cancers: a multicentric case-control study from India. AU - Sapkota,Amir, AU - Gajalakshmi,Vendhan, AU - Jetly,Dhaval H, AU - Roychowdhury,Soma, AU - Dikshit,Rajesh P, AU - Brennan,Paul, AU - Hashibe,Mia, AU - Boffetta,Paolo, Y1 - 2008/01/30/ PY - 2008/2/1/pubmed PY - 2008/6/17/medline PY - 2008/2/1/entrez SP - 321 EP - 8 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 37 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: A recent monograph by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has identified indoor air pollution from coal usage as a known human carcinogen, while that from biomass as a probable human carcinogen. Although as much as 74% of the Indian population relies on solid fuels for cooking, very little information is available on cancer risk associated with these fuels in India. METHODS: Using data from a multicentric case-control study of 799 lung and 1062 hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer cases, and 718 controls, we investigated indoor air pollution from various solid fuels as risk factors for these cancers in India. RESULTS: Compared with never users, individuals who always used coal had an increased risk of lung cancer [odds ratio (OR) 3.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.64-8.63]. Long duration of coal usage (>50 years) was a risk factor for hypopharyngeal (OR 3.47, CI 0.95-12.69) and laryngeal (OR 3.65, CI 1.11-11.93) cancers. An increased risk of hypopharyngeal cancer was observed among lifelong users of wood (OR 1.62, CI 1.14-2.32), however this was less apparent among never-smokers. Increasing level of smokiness inside the home was associated with an increasing risk of hypopharyngeal and lung cancer (P(trend) < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This study showed differential risks associated with indoor air pollution from wood and coal burning, and provides novel evidence on cancer risks associated with solid fuel usage in India. Our findings suggest that reducing indoor air pollution from solid fuels may contribute to prevention of these cancers in India, in addition to tobacco and alcohol control programs. SN - 1464-3685 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18234740/Indoor_air_pollution_from_solid_fuels_and_risk_of_hypopharyngeal/laryngeal_and_lung_cancers:_a_multicentric_case_control_study_from_India_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dym261 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -