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Anthropometric risk factors for colorectal polyps in African-American women.
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008 Apr; 16(4):859-68.O

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Colorectal adenomas are thought to be precursor lesions to colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer incidence and mortality in African-American women. Studies suggest that obesity is associated with risk of adenomas in white women, but little is known about the relation in African-American women. We prospectively examined the association between selected anthropometric factors and colorectal polyps in African-American women.

METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Data were obtained from the Black Women's Health Study (BWHS), a prospective cohort study of African-American women. From 1997 to 2003, we followed 33,403 women aged > or =30 years with no prior diagnosis of cancer or polyps. Cox regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of polyps, with adjustment for potential confounders.

RESULTS

After 211,797 person-years of follow-up, 1,189 cases of colorectal polyps were reported. The IRR comparing women with a current BMI > or =35 to <25 kg/m(2) was 1.35 (95% CI = 1.12-1.62), after adjustment for covariates including waist-to-hip ratio (WHR). Women who gained > or =30 kg since age 18 were 1.76 times as likely as those who gained <5 kg to report polyps (95% CI = 1.33-2.33). The IRR comparing the highest (>or =0.87) to lowest (<0.71) quintiles of WHR was 1.26 (95% CI = 1.04-1.54), after adjustment for covariates including BMI. BMI at age 18, adult height, and waist circumference (BMI-adjusted) were not materially associated with risk. Results were similar among women with a recent endoscopy.

DISCUSSION

Weight gain and obesity in adulthood may increase the risk of colorectal polyps in African-American women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. lwise@slone.bu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18239567

Citation

Wise, Lauren A., et al. "Anthropometric Risk Factors for Colorectal Polyps in African-American Women." Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), vol. 16, no. 4, 2008, pp. 859-68.
Wise LA, Rosenberg L, Palmer JR, et al. Anthropometric risk factors for colorectal polyps in African-American women. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008;16(4):859-68.
Wise, L. A., Rosenberg, L., Palmer, J. R., & Adams-Campbell, L. L. (2008). Anthropometric risk factors for colorectal polyps in African-American women. Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.), 16(4), 859-68. https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.139
Wise LA, et al. Anthropometric Risk Factors for Colorectal Polyps in African-American Women. Obesity (Silver Spring). 2008;16(4):859-68. PubMed PMID: 18239567.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anthropometric risk factors for colorectal polyps in African-American women. AU - Wise,Lauren A, AU - Rosenberg,Lynn, AU - Palmer,Julie R, AU - Adams-Campbell,Lucile L, Y1 - 2008/01/24/ PY - 2008/2/2/pubmed PY - 2008/6/19/medline PY - 2008/2/2/entrez SP - 859 EP - 68 JF - Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.) JO - Obesity (Silver Spring) VL - 16 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Colorectal adenomas are thought to be precursor lesions to colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer incidence and mortality in African-American women. Studies suggest that obesity is associated with risk of adenomas in white women, but little is known about the relation in African-American women. We prospectively examined the association between selected anthropometric factors and colorectal polyps in African-American women. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Data were obtained from the Black Women's Health Study (BWHS), a prospective cohort study of African-American women. From 1997 to 2003, we followed 33,403 women aged > or =30 years with no prior diagnosis of cancer or polyps. Cox regression was used to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of polyps, with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: After 211,797 person-years of follow-up, 1,189 cases of colorectal polyps were reported. The IRR comparing women with a current BMI > or =35 to <25 kg/m(2) was 1.35 (95% CI = 1.12-1.62), after adjustment for covariates including waist-to-hip ratio (WHR). Women who gained > or =30 kg since age 18 were 1.76 times as likely as those who gained <5 kg to report polyps (95% CI = 1.33-2.33). The IRR comparing the highest (>or =0.87) to lowest (<0.71) quintiles of WHR was 1.26 (95% CI = 1.04-1.54), after adjustment for covariates including BMI. BMI at age 18, adult height, and waist circumference (BMI-adjusted) were not materially associated with risk. Results were similar among women with a recent endoscopy. DISCUSSION: Weight gain and obesity in adulthood may increase the risk of colorectal polyps in African-American women. SN - 1930-7381 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18239567/Anthropometric_risk_factors_for_colorectal_polyps_in_African_American_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2007.139 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -