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Experimental biology and pathogenesis of Junin virus infection in animals and man.
Bull World Health Organ. 1975; 52(4-6):507-15.BW

Abstract

A fatal disease resembling Argentine haemorrhagic fever of man has been produced in guinea-pigs and mice by inoculation with Junin virus. Infected guinea-pigs show macroscopic and microscopic haemorrhagic lesions, marked bone marrow changes, decreased leukocytes and platelets in the peripheral blood, and impairment of immunological response. This response permits differentiation between pathogenic (XJ) and attenuated (XJ Cl(3)) strains. Guinea-pigs inoculated with the XJ Cl(3) strain develop an inapparent infection accompanied by slight haematological changes, the appearance of antibody, and protection against challenge with the pathogenic strain. The attenuated strain has been used successfully as an immunizing antigen in 636 human volunteers. Guinea-pigs infected with Tacaribe virus show cross-protection against Junin virus, with the presence of heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Suckling mice infected with Junin virus develop a typical viral encephalitis; the pathogenicity of the virus decreases with increasing age of the mice. Experiments with thymectomized mice and with mice treated with antithymocyte serum suggest that the pathogenicity of Junin virus in this host is related to the integrity of the thymus-dependent immune system. There is evidence that humoral antibodies do not play any role in the development of the encephalitic lesions but rather protect mice against Junin virus infection. A recent serological survey among laboratory workers and inhabitants of the endemic area has demonstrated the presence of inapparent infection with Junin virus.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

182401

Citation

Weissenbacher, M C., et al. "Experimental Biology and Pathogenesis of Junin Virus Infection in Animals and Man." Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 52, no. 4-6, 1975, pp. 507-15.
Weissenbacher MC, de Guerrero LB, Boxaca MC. Experimental biology and pathogenesis of Junin virus infection in animals and man. Bull World Health Organ. 1975;52(4-6):507-15.
Weissenbacher, M. C., de Guerrero, L. B., & Boxaca, M. C. (1975). Experimental biology and pathogenesis of Junin virus infection in animals and man. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 52(4-6), 507-15.
Weissenbacher MC, de Guerrero LB, Boxaca MC. Experimental Biology and Pathogenesis of Junin Virus Infection in Animals and Man. Bull World Health Organ. 1975;52(4-6):507-15. PubMed PMID: 182401.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Experimental biology and pathogenesis of Junin virus infection in animals and man. AU - Weissenbacher,M C, AU - de Guerrero,L B, AU - Boxaca,M C, PY - 1975/1/1/pubmed PY - 1975/1/1/medline PY - 1975/1/1/entrez SP - 507 EP - 15 JF - Bulletin of the World Health Organization JO - Bull World Health Organ VL - 52 IS - 4-6 N2 - A fatal disease resembling Argentine haemorrhagic fever of man has been produced in guinea-pigs and mice by inoculation with Junin virus. Infected guinea-pigs show macroscopic and microscopic haemorrhagic lesions, marked bone marrow changes, decreased leukocytes and platelets in the peripheral blood, and impairment of immunological response. This response permits differentiation between pathogenic (XJ) and attenuated (XJ Cl(3)) strains. Guinea-pigs inoculated with the XJ Cl(3) strain develop an inapparent infection accompanied by slight haematological changes, the appearance of antibody, and protection against challenge with the pathogenic strain. The attenuated strain has been used successfully as an immunizing antigen in 636 human volunteers. Guinea-pigs infected with Tacaribe virus show cross-protection against Junin virus, with the presence of heterologous neutralizing antibodies. Suckling mice infected with Junin virus develop a typical viral encephalitis; the pathogenicity of the virus decreases with increasing age of the mice. Experiments with thymectomized mice and with mice treated with antithymocyte serum suggest that the pathogenicity of Junin virus in this host is related to the integrity of the thymus-dependent immune system. There is evidence that humoral antibodies do not play any role in the development of the encephalitic lesions but rather protect mice against Junin virus infection. A recent serological survey among laboratory workers and inhabitants of the endemic area has demonstrated the presence of inapparent infection with Junin virus. SN - 0042-9686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/182401/Experimental_biology_and_pathogenesis_of_Junin_virus_infection_in_animals_and_man_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/182401/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -