Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Effects of a long-term exercise program on lower limb mobility, physiological responses, walking performance, and physical activity levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease.
J Vasc Surg. 2008 Feb; 47(2):303-9.JV

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a 12-month exercise program on lower limb mobility (temporal-spatial gait parameters and gait kinematics), walking performance, peak physiological responses, and physical activity levels in individuals with symptoms of intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD-IC).

METHODS

Participants (n = 21) with an appropriate history of PAD-IC, ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) <0.9 in at least one leg and a positive Edinburgh claudication questionnaire response were prospectively recruited. Participants were randomly allocated to either a control PAD-IC group (CPAD-IC) (n = 11) that received standard medical therapy and a treatment PAD-IC group (TPAD-IC) (n = 10), which also took part in a 12-month supervised exercise program. A further group of participants (n = 11) free of PAD (ABI >0.9) and who were non-regular exercisers were recruited from the community to act as age and mass matched controls (CON). Lower limb mobility was determined via two-dimensional video motion analysis. A graded treadmill test was used to assess walking performance and peak physiological responses to exercise. Physical activity levels were measured via a 7-day pedometer recording. Differences between groups were analyzed via repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA).

RESULTS

The 12-month supervised exercise program had no significant effect on lower limb mobility, peak physiological responses, or physical activity levels in TPAD-IC compared with CPAD-IC participants. However, the TPAD-IC participants demonstrated significantly greater walking performance (171% improvement in pain free walking time and 120% improvement in maximal walking time compared with baseline).

CONCLUSION

The results of this study confirm that a 12-month supervised exercise program will result in improved walking performance, but does not have an impact on lower limb mobility, peak physiological responses, or physical activity levels of PAD-IC patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Sport and Exercise Science, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland, Australia. Robert.Crowther@jcu.edu.au <Robert.Crowther@jcu.edu.au>No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18241753

Citation

Crowther, Robert G., et al. "Effects of a Long-term Exercise Program On Lower Limb Mobility, Physiological Responses, Walking Performance, and Physical Activity Levels in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease." Journal of Vascular Surgery, vol. 47, no. 2, 2008, pp. 303-9.
Crowther RG, Spinks WL, Leicht AS, et al. Effects of a long-term exercise program on lower limb mobility, physiological responses, walking performance, and physical activity levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease. J Vasc Surg. 2008;47(2):303-9.
Crowther, R. G., Spinks, W. L., Leicht, A. S., Sangla, K., Quigley, F., & Golledge, J. (2008). Effects of a long-term exercise program on lower limb mobility, physiological responses, walking performance, and physical activity levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 47(2), 303-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvs.2007.10.038
Crowther RG, et al. Effects of a Long-term Exercise Program On Lower Limb Mobility, Physiological Responses, Walking Performance, and Physical Activity Levels in Patients With Peripheral Arterial Disease. J Vasc Surg. 2008;47(2):303-9. PubMed PMID: 18241753.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of a long-term exercise program on lower limb mobility, physiological responses, walking performance, and physical activity levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease. AU - Crowther,Robert G, AU - Spinks,Warwick L, AU - Leicht,Anthony S, AU - Sangla,Kunwarjit, AU - Quigley,Frank, AU - Golledge,Jonathan, PY - 2007/08/14/received PY - 2007/10/18/revised PY - 2007/10/22/accepted PY - 2008/2/5/pubmed PY - 2008/3/14/medline PY - 2008/2/5/entrez SP - 303 EP - 9 JF - Journal of vascular surgery JO - J Vasc Surg VL - 47 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a 12-month exercise program on lower limb mobility (temporal-spatial gait parameters and gait kinematics), walking performance, peak physiological responses, and physical activity levels in individuals with symptoms of intermittent claudication due to peripheral arterial disease (PAD-IC). METHODS: Participants (n = 21) with an appropriate history of PAD-IC, ankle-brachial pressure index (ABI) <0.9 in at least one leg and a positive Edinburgh claudication questionnaire response were prospectively recruited. Participants were randomly allocated to either a control PAD-IC group (CPAD-IC) (n = 11) that received standard medical therapy and a treatment PAD-IC group (TPAD-IC) (n = 10), which also took part in a 12-month supervised exercise program. A further group of participants (n = 11) free of PAD (ABI >0.9) and who were non-regular exercisers were recruited from the community to act as age and mass matched controls (CON). Lower limb mobility was determined via two-dimensional video motion analysis. A graded treadmill test was used to assess walking performance and peak physiological responses to exercise. Physical activity levels were measured via a 7-day pedometer recording. Differences between groups were analyzed via repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: The 12-month supervised exercise program had no significant effect on lower limb mobility, peak physiological responses, or physical activity levels in TPAD-IC compared with CPAD-IC participants. However, the TPAD-IC participants demonstrated significantly greater walking performance (171% improvement in pain free walking time and 120% improvement in maximal walking time compared with baseline). CONCLUSION: The results of this study confirm that a 12-month supervised exercise program will result in improved walking performance, but does not have an impact on lower limb mobility, peak physiological responses, or physical activity levels of PAD-IC patients. SN - 0741-5214 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18241753/Effects_of_a_long_term_exercise_program_on_lower_limb_mobility_physiological_responses_walking_performance_and_physical_activity_levels_in_patients_with_peripheral_arterial_disease_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0741-5214(07)01740-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -