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Adverse impact of sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.
Urology 2008; 71(1):79-84U

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To examine the prevalence, characteristics, and impact of sexual dysfunction in our primary care referral population.

METHODS

Participants seeking treatment for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) were recruited from general urology clinics. The subjects completed the National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index, International Index of Erectile Function-5, and selected questions from the University of Washington Symptom Score. Additional information on demographics and medical and treatment history were also obtained. Sexual dysfunction was defined as self-reported erectile dysfunction (ED) or ejaculatory difficulty, or both.

RESULTS

Of 296 participants with CP/CPPS, 214 (72.3%) reported sexual dysfunction. The National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total score averaged 22.5 +/- 6.9 for participants with sexual dysfunction compared with 20.4 +/- 7.8 for participants who did not report sexual dysfunction (P = 0.03). Of the 214 participants with sexual dysfunction, 54 (25.0%) complained of ED only, 71 (33.4%) complained of ejaculatory difficulties only, and 89 (41.6%) complained of both ED and ejaculatory difficulties. Men reporting both ED and ejaculatory difficulty reported worse CP/CPPS symptoms (analysis of variance, P = 0.042) and worse quality of life (analysis of variance, P = 0.006) than men without sexual dysfunction.

CONCLUSIONS

Sexual dysfunction was reported by almost three quarters of patients with CP/CPPS. Patients with CP/CPPS and sexual dysfunction experienced substantially worse symptoms, particularly worse quality of life, than other patients with CP/CPPS. Sexual dysfunction merits consideration as an important aspect of CP/CPPS and a potential outcome measure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Science Malaysia, Penang, Malaysia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18242370

Citation

Lee, Shaun Wen Huey, et al. "Adverse Impact of Sexual Dysfunction in Chronic Prostatitis/chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome." Urology, vol. 71, no. 1, 2008, pp. 79-84.
Lee SW, Liong ML, Yuen KH, et al. Adverse impact of sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Urology. 2008;71(1):79-84.
Lee, S. W., Liong, M. L., Yuen, K. H., Leong, W. S., Cheah, P. Y., Khan, N. A., & Krieger, J. N. (2008). Adverse impact of sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Urology, 71(1), pp. 79-84. doi:10.1016/j.urology.2007.08.043.
Lee SW, et al. Adverse Impact of Sexual Dysfunction in Chronic Prostatitis/chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome. Urology. 2008;71(1):79-84. PubMed PMID: 18242370.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adverse impact of sexual dysfunction in chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. AU - Lee,Shaun Wen Huey, AU - Liong,Men Long, AU - Yuen,Kah Hay, AU - Leong,Wing Seng, AU - Cheah,Phaik Yeong, AU - Khan,Nurzalina Abdul Karim, AU - Krieger,John N, PY - 2007/04/06/received PY - 2007/07/10/revised PY - 2007/08/16/accepted PY - 2008/2/5/pubmed PY - 2008/2/22/medline PY - 2008/2/5/entrez SP - 79 EP - 84 JF - Urology JO - Urology VL - 71 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To examine the prevalence, characteristics, and impact of sexual dysfunction in our primary care referral population. METHODS: Participants seeking treatment for chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) were recruited from general urology clinics. The subjects completed the National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index, International Index of Erectile Function-5, and selected questions from the University of Washington Symptom Score. Additional information on demographics and medical and treatment history were also obtained. Sexual dysfunction was defined as self-reported erectile dysfunction (ED) or ejaculatory difficulty, or both. RESULTS: Of 296 participants with CP/CPPS, 214 (72.3%) reported sexual dysfunction. The National Institutes of Health-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total score averaged 22.5 +/- 6.9 for participants with sexual dysfunction compared with 20.4 +/- 7.8 for participants who did not report sexual dysfunction (P = 0.03). Of the 214 participants with sexual dysfunction, 54 (25.0%) complained of ED only, 71 (33.4%) complained of ejaculatory difficulties only, and 89 (41.6%) complained of both ED and ejaculatory difficulties. Men reporting both ED and ejaculatory difficulty reported worse CP/CPPS symptoms (analysis of variance, P = 0.042) and worse quality of life (analysis of variance, P = 0.006) than men without sexual dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual dysfunction was reported by almost three quarters of patients with CP/CPPS. Patients with CP/CPPS and sexual dysfunction experienced substantially worse symptoms, particularly worse quality of life, than other patients with CP/CPPS. Sexual dysfunction merits consideration as an important aspect of CP/CPPS and a potential outcome measure. SN - 1527-9995 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18242370/Adverse_impact_of_sexual_dysfunction_in_chronic_prostatitis/chronic_pelvic_pain_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0090-4295(07)02044-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -