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Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis.
Am Fam Physician. 2008 Jan 15; 77(2):177-84.AF

Abstract

A large number of dietary supplements are promoted to patients with osteoarthritis and as many as one third of those patients have used a supplement to treat their condition. Glucosamine-containing supplements are among the most commonly used products for osteoarthritis. Although the evidence is not entirely consistent, most research suggests that glucosamine sulfate can improve symptoms of pain related to osteoarthritis, as well as slow disease progression in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Chondroitin sulfate also appears to reduce osteoarthritis symptoms and is often combined with glucosamine, but there is no reliable evidence that the combination is more effective than either agent alone. S-adenosylmethionine may reduce pain but high costs and product quality issues limit its use. Several other supplements are promoted for treating osteoarthritis, such as methylsulfonylmethane, Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw), Curcuma longa (turmeric), and Zingiber officinale (ginger), but there is insufficient reliable evidence regarding long-term safety or effectiveness.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Creighton University School of Pharmacy and Health Professions, Omaha, Nebraska 68178, USA. pgregory@creighton.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18246887

Citation

Gregory, Philip J., et al. "Dietary Supplements for Osteoarthritis." American Family Physician, vol. 77, no. 2, 2008, pp. 177-84.
Gregory PJ, Sperry M, Wilson AF. Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis. Am Fam Physician. 2008;77(2):177-84.
Gregory, P. J., Sperry, M., & Wilson, A. F. (2008). Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis. American Family Physician, 77(2), 177-84.
Gregory PJ, Sperry M, Wilson AF. Dietary Supplements for Osteoarthritis. Am Fam Physician. 2008 Jan 15;77(2):177-84. PubMed PMID: 18246887.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary supplements for osteoarthritis. AU - Gregory,Philip J, AU - Sperry,Morgan, AU - Wilson,Amy Friedman, PY - 2008/2/6/pubmed PY - 2008/3/5/medline PY - 2008/2/6/entrez SP - 177 EP - 84 JF - American family physician JO - Am Fam Physician VL - 77 IS - 2 N2 - A large number of dietary supplements are promoted to patients with osteoarthritis and as many as one third of those patients have used a supplement to treat their condition. Glucosamine-containing supplements are among the most commonly used products for osteoarthritis. Although the evidence is not entirely consistent, most research suggests that glucosamine sulfate can improve symptoms of pain related to osteoarthritis, as well as slow disease progression in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee. Chondroitin sulfate also appears to reduce osteoarthritis symptoms and is often combined with glucosamine, but there is no reliable evidence that the combination is more effective than either agent alone. S-adenosylmethionine may reduce pain but high costs and product quality issues limit its use. Several other supplements are promoted for treating osteoarthritis, such as methylsulfonylmethane, Harpagophytum procumbens (devil's claw), Curcuma longa (turmeric), and Zingiber officinale (ginger), but there is insufficient reliable evidence regarding long-term safety or effectiveness. SN - 0002-838X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18246887/Dietary_supplements_for_osteoarthritis_ L2 - http://www.aafp.org/link_out?pmid=18246887 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -