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Perception of clear fricatives by normal-hearing and simulated hearing-impaired listeners.
J Acoust Soc Am. 2008 Feb; 123(2):1114-25.JA

Abstract

Speakers may adapt the phonetic details of their productions when they anticipate perceptual difficulty or comprehension failure on the part of a listener. Previous research suggests that a speaking style known as clear speech is more intelligible overall than casual, conversational speech for a variety of listener populations. However, it is unknown whether clear speech improves the intelligibility of fricative consonants specifically, or how its effects on fricative perception might differ depending on listener population. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether clear speech enhances fricative intelligibility for normal-hearing listeners and listeners with simulated impairment. Two experiments measured babble signal-to-noise ratio thresholds for fricative minimal pair distinctions for 14 normal-hearing listeners and 14 listeners with simulated sloping, recruiting impairment. Results indicated that clear speech helped both groups overall. However, for impaired listeners, reliable clear speech intelligibility advantages were not found for non-sibilant pairs. Correlation analyses comparing acoustic and perceptual data indicated that a shift of energy concentration toward higher frequency regions and greater source strength contributed to the clear speech effect for normal-hearing listeners. Correlations between acoustic and perceptual data were less consistent for listeners with simulated impairment, and suggested that lower-frequency information may play a role.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Linguistics, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66044, USA. kazumi.maniwa@uni-konstanz.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18247912

Citation

Maniwa, Kazumi, et al. "Perception of Clear Fricatives By Normal-hearing and Simulated Hearing-impaired Listeners." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 123, no. 2, 2008, pp. 1114-25.
Maniwa K, Jongman A, Wade T. Perception of clear fricatives by normal-hearing and simulated hearing-impaired listeners. J Acoust Soc Am. 2008;123(2):1114-25.
Maniwa, K., Jongman, A., & Wade, T. (2008). Perception of clear fricatives by normal-hearing and simulated hearing-impaired listeners. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 123(2), 1114-25. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2821966
Maniwa K, Jongman A, Wade T. Perception of Clear Fricatives By Normal-hearing and Simulated Hearing-impaired Listeners. J Acoust Soc Am. 2008;123(2):1114-25. PubMed PMID: 18247912.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perception of clear fricatives by normal-hearing and simulated hearing-impaired listeners. AU - Maniwa,Kazumi, AU - Jongman,Allard, AU - Wade,Travis, PY - 2008/2/6/pubmed PY - 2008/3/26/medline PY - 2008/2/6/entrez SP - 1114 EP - 25 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J Acoust Soc Am VL - 123 IS - 2 N2 - Speakers may adapt the phonetic details of their productions when they anticipate perceptual difficulty or comprehension failure on the part of a listener. Previous research suggests that a speaking style known as clear speech is more intelligible overall than casual, conversational speech for a variety of listener populations. However, it is unknown whether clear speech improves the intelligibility of fricative consonants specifically, or how its effects on fricative perception might differ depending on listener population. The primary goal of this study was to determine whether clear speech enhances fricative intelligibility for normal-hearing listeners and listeners with simulated impairment. Two experiments measured babble signal-to-noise ratio thresholds for fricative minimal pair distinctions for 14 normal-hearing listeners and 14 listeners with simulated sloping, recruiting impairment. Results indicated that clear speech helped both groups overall. However, for impaired listeners, reliable clear speech intelligibility advantages were not found for non-sibilant pairs. Correlation analyses comparing acoustic and perceptual data indicated that a shift of energy concentration toward higher frequency regions and greater source strength contributed to the clear speech effect for normal-hearing listeners. Correlations between acoustic and perceptual data were less consistent for listeners with simulated impairment, and suggested that lower-frequency information may play a role. SN - 1520-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18247912/Perception_of_clear_fricatives_by_normal_hearing_and_simulated_hearing_impaired_listeners_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -