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Solar UV reduces Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst infectivity in environmental waters.
J Appl Microbiol. 2008 May; 104(5):1311-23.JA

Abstract

AIMS

To determine the effect of solar radiation on Cryptosporidium parvum in tap and environmental waters.

METHODS AND RESULTS

Outdoor tank experiments and a cell culture infectivity assay were used to measure solar inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in different waters. Experiments conducted on days with different levels of solar insolation identified rapid inactivation of oocysts in tap water (up to 90% inactivation within the first hour). Increased dissolved organic carbon content in environmental waters decreased solar inactivation. The role of solar ultraviolet (UV) in inactivation was confirmed by long-pass filter experiments, where UV-B was identified as the most germicidal wavelength. Reductions in oocyst infectivity following solar radiation were not related to a loss of excystation capacity.

CONCLUSIONS

Solar UV can rapidly inactivate C. parvum in environmental waters.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY

This is the first study to assess natural sunlight inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in surface waters and drinking water using an infectivity measure and determines the wavelengths of light responsible for the inactivation. The findings presented here provide valuable information for determining the relative risks associated with Cryptosporidium oocysts in aquatic environments and identify solar radiation as a critical process affecting the oocyst survival in the environment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Co-operative Research Centre for Water Quality and Treatment, Australian Water Quality Centre, SA Water Corporation, Salisbury, South Australia, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18248370

Citation

King, B J., et al. "Solar UV Reduces Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocyst Infectivity in Environmental Waters." Journal of Applied Microbiology, vol. 104, no. 5, 2008, pp. 1311-23.
King BJ, Hoefel D, Daminato DP, et al. Solar UV reduces Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst infectivity in environmental waters. J Appl Microbiol. 2008;104(5):1311-23.
King, B. J., Hoefel, D., Daminato, D. P., Fanok, S., & Monis, P. T. (2008). Solar UV reduces Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst infectivity in environmental waters. Journal of Applied Microbiology, 104(5), 1311-23. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2672.2007.03658.x
King BJ, et al. Solar UV Reduces Cryptosporidium Parvum Oocyst Infectivity in Environmental Waters. J Appl Microbiol. 2008;104(5):1311-23. PubMed PMID: 18248370.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Solar UV reduces Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst infectivity in environmental waters. AU - King,B J, AU - Hoefel,D, AU - Daminato,D P, AU - Fanok,S, AU - Monis,P T, Y1 - 2008/01/31/ PY - 2008/2/6/pubmed PY - 2008/9/3/medline PY - 2008/2/6/entrez SP - 1311 EP - 23 JF - Journal of applied microbiology JO - J Appl Microbiol VL - 104 IS - 5 N2 - AIMS: To determine the effect of solar radiation on Cryptosporidium parvum in tap and environmental waters. METHODS AND RESULTS: Outdoor tank experiments and a cell culture infectivity assay were used to measure solar inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in different waters. Experiments conducted on days with different levels of solar insolation identified rapid inactivation of oocysts in tap water (up to 90% inactivation within the first hour). Increased dissolved organic carbon content in environmental waters decreased solar inactivation. The role of solar ultraviolet (UV) in inactivation was confirmed by long-pass filter experiments, where UV-B was identified as the most germicidal wavelength. Reductions in oocyst infectivity following solar radiation were not related to a loss of excystation capacity. CONCLUSIONS: Solar UV can rapidly inactivate C. parvum in environmental waters. SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: This is the first study to assess natural sunlight inactivation of C. parvum oocysts in surface waters and drinking water using an infectivity measure and determines the wavelengths of light responsible for the inactivation. The findings presented here provide valuable information for determining the relative risks associated with Cryptosporidium oocysts in aquatic environments and identify solar radiation as a critical process affecting the oocyst survival in the environment. SN - 1365-2672 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18248370/Solar_UV_reduces_Cryptosporidium_parvum_oocyst_infectivity_in_environmental_waters_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -