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Being bullied as an environmentally mediated contributing factor to children's internalizing problems: a study of twins discordant for victimization.
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008 Feb; 162(2):145-50.AP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To test whether the experience of being bullied has an environmentally mediated effect on internalizing symptoms in young children.

DESIGN

A genetically informative, longitudinal 1994-1995 birth cohort.

SETTING

A nationally representative sample from the United Kingdom.

PARTICIPANTS

We examined 1116 twin pairs who are participants in the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study. Main Exposure The experience of being bullied between the ages of 7 and 9 years.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Mothers' and teachers' reports of children's internalizing problems at 7 and 10 years of age.

RESULTS

Monozygotic twins who had been bullied had more internalizing symptoms (mean, 0.23; SD, 1.00) compared with their co-twin who had not been bullied (mean, -0.13; SD, 0.86), indicating that being bullied has an environmentally mediated effect on children's internalizing problems (beta, 0.36 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.18-0.54]). This effect remained significant after controlling for preexisting internalizing problems (beta, 0.26 [95% CI, 0.09-0.44]).

CONCLUSIONS

Being bullied at a young age is an environmentally mediated contributing factor to children's internalizing problems. Intervention programs aimed at reducing bullying behavior in schools and in the community have the potential to influence children's early symptoms of mental health problems.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Medical Research Council Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Campus Box P080, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, England. l.arseneault@iop.kcl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Twin Study

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18250239

Citation

Arseneault, Louise, et al. "Being Bullied as an Environmentally Mediated Contributing Factor to Children's Internalizing Problems: a Study of Twins Discordant for Victimization." Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, vol. 162, no. 2, 2008, pp. 145-50.
Arseneault L, Milne BJ, Taylor A, et al. Being bullied as an environmentally mediated contributing factor to children's internalizing problems: a study of twins discordant for victimization. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008;162(2):145-50.
Arseneault, L., Milne, B. J., Taylor, A., Adams, F., Delgado, K., Caspi, A., & Moffitt, T. E. (2008). Being bullied as an environmentally mediated contributing factor to children's internalizing problems: a study of twins discordant for victimization. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 162(2), 145-50. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpediatrics.2007.53
Arseneault L, et al. Being Bullied as an Environmentally Mediated Contributing Factor to Children's Internalizing Problems: a Study of Twins Discordant for Victimization. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2008;162(2):145-50. PubMed PMID: 18250239.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Being bullied as an environmentally mediated contributing factor to children's internalizing problems: a study of twins discordant for victimization. AU - Arseneault,Louise, AU - Milne,Barry J, AU - Taylor,Alan, AU - Adams,Felicity, AU - Delgado,Kira, AU - Caspi,Avshalom, AU - Moffitt,Terrie E, PY - 2008/2/6/pubmed PY - 2008/3/7/medline PY - 2008/2/6/entrez SP - 145 EP - 50 JF - Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine JO - Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med VL - 162 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To test whether the experience of being bullied has an environmentally mediated effect on internalizing symptoms in young children. DESIGN: A genetically informative, longitudinal 1994-1995 birth cohort. SETTING: A nationally representative sample from the United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: We examined 1116 twin pairs who are participants in the Environmental Risk Longitudinal Twin Study. Main Exposure The experience of being bullied between the ages of 7 and 9 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mothers' and teachers' reports of children's internalizing problems at 7 and 10 years of age. RESULTS: Monozygotic twins who had been bullied had more internalizing symptoms (mean, 0.23; SD, 1.00) compared with their co-twin who had not been bullied (mean, -0.13; SD, 0.86), indicating that being bullied has an environmentally mediated effect on children's internalizing problems (beta, 0.36 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.18-0.54]). This effect remained significant after controlling for preexisting internalizing problems (beta, 0.26 [95% CI, 0.09-0.44]). CONCLUSIONS: Being bullied at a young age is an environmentally mediated contributing factor to children's internalizing problems. Intervention programs aimed at reducing bullying behavior in schools and in the community have the potential to influence children's early symptoms of mental health problems. SN - 1538-3628 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18250239/Being_bullied_as_an_environmentally_mediated_contributing_factor_to_children's_internalizing_problems:_a_study_of_twins_discordant_for_victimization_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/10.1001/archpediatrics.2007.53 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -