Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Longitudinal progression of movement abnormalities in relation to psychotic symptoms in adolescents at high risk of schizophrenia.
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008 Feb; 65(2):165-71.AG

Abstract

CONTEXT

Because recent findings suggest that early treatment may ameliorate the course or even prevent the onset of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, longitudinal high-risk research on biological markers of risk has become a priority. Within this context, premorbid movement abnormalities are of particular interest because the neurocircuitry hypothesized to give rise to dyskinetic movements has also been implicated in psychotic symptoms. To date, there have been no published longitudinal studies examining the progression of movement abnormalities and their relation with symptom progression in at-risk youth.

OBJECTIVE

To examine the progression of movement abnormalities in relation to positive and negative symptoms in adolescents at high risk of developing psychotic disorders.

DESIGN

Naturalistic, prospective, longitudinal design.

SETTING

Participants recruited through announcements directed at parents of adolescents showing schizotypal symptoms.

PARTICIPANTS

One hundred twenty-one adolescents (mean baseline age, 14.26 years), 32 with schizotypal personality disorder, 49 nonclinical controls, and 40 with other personality disorders.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Participating adolescents were evaluated for personality disorders (Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders), prodromal symptoms (Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms), and movement abnormalities (Dyskinesia Identification System Condensed User Scale) at 3 annual assessments.

RESULTS

The schizotypal group exhibited significantly elevated movement abnormalities in comparison with controls across all 3 time points. Further, the schizotypal personality disorder group alone showed significant increases in movement abnormalities over time. Movement abnormalities were correlated with prodromal symptoms at each time period, and for several body regions, the magnitude of this relationship significantly increased over time.

CONCLUSIONS

The results are consistent with the hypothesis of shared neural circuitry for movement abnormalities and psychotic symptoms and suggest the potential value of including an assessment of motor signs in screening for psychosis risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia 30322, USA. vmittal@emory.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18250254

Citation

Mittal, Vijay A., et al. "Longitudinal Progression of Movement Abnormalities in Relation to Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents at High Risk of Schizophrenia." Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 65, no. 2, 2008, pp. 165-71.
Mittal VA, Neumann C, Saczawa M, et al. Longitudinal progression of movement abnormalities in relation to psychotic symptoms in adolescents at high risk of schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008;65(2):165-71.
Mittal, V. A., Neumann, C., Saczawa, M., & Walker, E. F. (2008). Longitudinal progression of movement abnormalities in relation to psychotic symptoms in adolescents at high risk of schizophrenia. Archives of General Psychiatry, 65(2), 165-71. https://doi.org/10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2007.23
Mittal VA, et al. Longitudinal Progression of Movement Abnormalities in Relation to Psychotic Symptoms in Adolescents at High Risk of Schizophrenia. Arch Gen Psychiatry. 2008;65(2):165-71. PubMed PMID: 18250254.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal progression of movement abnormalities in relation to psychotic symptoms in adolescents at high risk of schizophrenia. AU - Mittal,Vijay A, AU - Neumann,Craig, AU - Saczawa,Mary, AU - Walker,Elaine F, PY - 2008/2/6/pubmed PY - 2008/2/22/medline PY - 2008/2/6/entrez SP - 165 EP - 71 JF - Archives of general psychiatry JO - Arch Gen Psychiatry VL - 65 IS - 2 N2 - CONTEXT: Because recent findings suggest that early treatment may ameliorate the course or even prevent the onset of schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, longitudinal high-risk research on biological markers of risk has become a priority. Within this context, premorbid movement abnormalities are of particular interest because the neurocircuitry hypothesized to give rise to dyskinetic movements has also been implicated in psychotic symptoms. To date, there have been no published longitudinal studies examining the progression of movement abnormalities and their relation with symptom progression in at-risk youth. OBJECTIVE: To examine the progression of movement abnormalities in relation to positive and negative symptoms in adolescents at high risk of developing psychotic disorders. DESIGN: Naturalistic, prospective, longitudinal design. SETTING: Participants recruited through announcements directed at parents of adolescents showing schizotypal symptoms. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred twenty-one adolescents (mean baseline age, 14.26 years), 32 with schizotypal personality disorder, 49 nonclinical controls, and 40 with other personality disorders. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Participating adolescents were evaluated for personality disorders (Structured Interview for DSM-IV Personality Disorders), prodromal symptoms (Structured Interview for Prodromal Symptoms), and movement abnormalities (Dyskinesia Identification System Condensed User Scale) at 3 annual assessments. RESULTS: The schizotypal group exhibited significantly elevated movement abnormalities in comparison with controls across all 3 time points. Further, the schizotypal personality disorder group alone showed significant increases in movement abnormalities over time. Movement abnormalities were correlated with prodromal symptoms at each time period, and for several body regions, the magnitude of this relationship significantly increased over time. CONCLUSIONS: The results are consistent with the hypothesis of shared neural circuitry for movement abnormalities and psychotic symptoms and suggest the potential value of including an assessment of motor signs in screening for psychosis risk. SN - 1538-3636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18250254/Longitudinal_progression_of_movement_abnormalities_in_relation_to_psychotic_symptoms_in_adolescents_at_high_risk_of_schizophrenia_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/10.1001/archgenpsychiatry.2007.23 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -