Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Circulating adiponectin levels associate with inflammatory markers, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome independent of obesity.
Int J Obes (Lond). 2008 May; 32(5):772-9.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Adiponectin is an abundantly expressed adipocyte-specific protein, whose level is decreased in obesity, and which appears to be a key participant in developing inflammation, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome (MetS). We examined whether the relationship between adiponectin and inflammatory markers, insulin resistance and MetS was independent of obesity.

METHODS AND RESULTS

The study was performed in 1094 men and women, aged 27-77 years, from a representative community population. We measured serum inflammatory markers, homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and prevalent MetS using National Cholesterol Education Program ATPIII criteria. Sex- and age-adjusted plasma adiponectin concentration was inversely correlated with body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, glucose and fasting insulin, and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (all P<0.005). Log plasma adiponectin was a significant negative correlate of the levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, interleukin-18, fibrinogen and white cell count independent of level of obesity. Log plasma adiponectin was also an inverse associate of log HOMA-IR (P<0.001) independent of obesity. Subjects in the top compared to bottom sex-specific plasma adiponectin quartile had a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 0.21 (95% CI, 0.11-0.42; P<0.001) for prevalent MetS, and the association was independent of age, sex, BMI, log insulin and log interleukin-18 levels.

CONCLUSION

Our findings suggest that higher circulating adiponectin levels may mitigate against adipose-related inflammation, insulin resistance and MetS as much in lean as obese persons. At any rate circulating adiponectin level is a strong risk marker for MetS, which is independent of measures of adiposity, insulin resistance and inflammatory markers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Campus of the Heart Research Institute of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. jhung@cyllene.uwa.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18253163

Citation

Hung, J, et al. "Circulating Adiponectin Levels Associate With Inflammatory Markers, Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome Independent of Obesity." International Journal of Obesity (2005), vol. 32, no. 5, 2008, pp. 772-9.
Hung J, McQuillan BM, Thompson PL, et al. Circulating adiponectin levels associate with inflammatory markers, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome independent of obesity. Int J Obes (Lond). 2008;32(5):772-9.
Hung, J., McQuillan, B. M., Thompson, P. L., & Beilby, J. P. (2008). Circulating adiponectin levels associate with inflammatory markers, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome independent of obesity. International Journal of Obesity (2005), 32(5), 772-9. https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803793
Hung J, et al. Circulating Adiponectin Levels Associate With Inflammatory Markers, Insulin Resistance and Metabolic Syndrome Independent of Obesity. Int J Obes (Lond). 2008;32(5):772-9. PubMed PMID: 18253163.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Circulating adiponectin levels associate with inflammatory markers, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome independent of obesity. AU - Hung,J, AU - McQuillan,B M, AU - Thompson,P L, AU - Beilby,J P, Y1 - 2008/02/05/ PY - 2008/2/7/pubmed PY - 2008/8/12/medline PY - 2008/2/7/entrez SP - 772 EP - 9 JF - International journal of obesity (2005) JO - Int J Obes (Lond) VL - 32 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Adiponectin is an abundantly expressed adipocyte-specific protein, whose level is decreased in obesity, and which appears to be a key participant in developing inflammation, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome (MetS). We examined whether the relationship between adiponectin and inflammatory markers, insulin resistance and MetS was independent of obesity. METHODS AND RESULTS: The study was performed in 1094 men and women, aged 27-77 years, from a representative community population. We measured serum inflammatory markers, homoeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and prevalent MetS using National Cholesterol Education Program ATPIII criteria. Sex- and age-adjusted plasma adiponectin concentration was inversely correlated with body mass index (BMI), waist-hip ratio, diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, glucose and fasting insulin, and positively correlated with HDL cholesterol (all P<0.005). Log plasma adiponectin was a significant negative correlate of the levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, interleukin-18, fibrinogen and white cell count independent of level of obesity. Log plasma adiponectin was also an inverse associate of log HOMA-IR (P<0.001) independent of obesity. Subjects in the top compared to bottom sex-specific plasma adiponectin quartile had a multivariate-adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 0.21 (95% CI, 0.11-0.42; P<0.001) for prevalent MetS, and the association was independent of age, sex, BMI, log insulin and log interleukin-18 levels. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that higher circulating adiponectin levels may mitigate against adipose-related inflammation, insulin resistance and MetS as much in lean as obese persons. At any rate circulating adiponectin level is a strong risk marker for MetS, which is independent of measures of adiposity, insulin resistance and inflammatory markers. SN - 1476-5497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18253163/Circulating_adiponectin_levels_associate_with_inflammatory_markers_insulin_resistance_and_metabolic_syndrome_independent_of_obesity_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ijo.0803793 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -