Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A longitudinal study of environmental tobacco smoke exposure in children: parental self reports versus age dependent biomarkers.
BMC Public Health. 2008 Feb 06; 8:47.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Awareness of the negative effects of smoking on children's health prompted a decrease in the self-reporting of parental tobacco use in periodic surveys from most industrialized countries. Our aim is to assess changes between ETS exposure at the end of pregnancy and at 4 years of age determined by the parents' self-report and measurement of cotinine in age related biological matrices.

METHODS

The prospective birth cohort included 487 infants from Barcelona city (Spain). Mothers were asked about maternal and household smoking habit. Cord serum and children's urinary cotinine were analyzed in duplicate using a double antibody radioimmunoassay.

RESULTS

At 4 years of age, the median urinary cotinine level in children increased 1.4 or 3.5 times when father or mother smoked, respectively. Cotinine levels in children's urine statistically differentiated children from smoking mothers (Geometric Mean (GM) 19.7 ng/ml; 95% CI 16.83-23.01) and exposed homes (GM 7.1 ng/ml; 95% CI 5.61-8.99) compared with non-exposed homes (GM 4.5 ng/ml; 95% CI 3.71-5.48). Maternal self-reported ETS exposure in homes declined in the four year span between the two time periods from 42.2% to 31.0% (p < 0.01). Nevertheless, most of the children considered non-exposed by their mothers had detectable levels of cotinine above 1 ng/mL in their urine.

CONCLUSION

We concluded that cotinine levels determined in cord blood and urine, respectively, were useful for categorizing the children exposed to smoking and showed that a certain increase in ETS exposure during the 4-year follow-up period occurred.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Environmental and Pediatric Research Unit (URIE), Pediatric Department, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain. carmepuig@yahoo.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18254964

Citation

Puig, Carme, et al. "A Longitudinal Study of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Children: Parental Self Reports Versus Age Dependent Biomarkers." BMC Public Health, vol. 8, 2008, p. 47.
Puig C, Garcia-Algar O, Monleon T, et al. A longitudinal study of environmental tobacco smoke exposure in children: parental self reports versus age dependent biomarkers. BMC Public Health. 2008;8:47.
Puig, C., Garcia-Algar, O., Monleon, T., Pacifici, R., Zuccaro, P., Sunyer, J., Figueroa, C., Pichini, S., & Vall, O. (2008). A longitudinal study of environmental tobacco smoke exposure in children: parental self reports versus age dependent biomarkers. BMC Public Health, 8, 47. https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-8-47
Puig C, et al. A Longitudinal Study of Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure in Children: Parental Self Reports Versus Age Dependent Biomarkers. BMC Public Health. 2008 Feb 6;8:47. PubMed PMID: 18254964.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A longitudinal study of environmental tobacco smoke exposure in children: parental self reports versus age dependent biomarkers. AU - Puig,Carme, AU - Garcia-Algar,Oscar, AU - Monleon,Toni, AU - Pacifici,Roberta, AU - Zuccaro,Piergiorgio, AU - Sunyer,Jordi, AU - Figueroa,Cecilia, AU - Pichini,Simona, AU - Vall,Oriol, Y1 - 2008/02/06/ PY - 2007/07/23/received PY - 2008/02/06/accepted PY - 2008/2/8/pubmed PY - 2008/4/26/medline PY - 2008/2/8/entrez SP - 47 EP - 47 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 8 N2 - BACKGROUND: Awareness of the negative effects of smoking on children's health prompted a decrease in the self-reporting of parental tobacco use in periodic surveys from most industrialized countries. Our aim is to assess changes between ETS exposure at the end of pregnancy and at 4 years of age determined by the parents' self-report and measurement of cotinine in age related biological matrices. METHODS: The prospective birth cohort included 487 infants from Barcelona city (Spain). Mothers were asked about maternal and household smoking habit. Cord serum and children's urinary cotinine were analyzed in duplicate using a double antibody radioimmunoassay. RESULTS: At 4 years of age, the median urinary cotinine level in children increased 1.4 or 3.5 times when father or mother smoked, respectively. Cotinine levels in children's urine statistically differentiated children from smoking mothers (Geometric Mean (GM) 19.7 ng/ml; 95% CI 16.83-23.01) and exposed homes (GM 7.1 ng/ml; 95% CI 5.61-8.99) compared with non-exposed homes (GM 4.5 ng/ml; 95% CI 3.71-5.48). Maternal self-reported ETS exposure in homes declined in the four year span between the two time periods from 42.2% to 31.0% (p < 0.01). Nevertheless, most of the children considered non-exposed by their mothers had detectable levels of cotinine above 1 ng/mL in their urine. CONCLUSION: We concluded that cotinine levels determined in cord blood and urine, respectively, were useful for categorizing the children exposed to smoking and showed that a certain increase in ETS exposure during the 4-year follow-up period occurred. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18254964/A_longitudinal_study_of_environmental_tobacco_smoke_exposure_in_children:_parental_self_reports_versus_age_dependent_biomarkers_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-8-47 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -