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Depressive symptoms moderate the influence of hostility on serum interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein.
Psychosom Med. 2008 Feb; 70(2):197-204.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Recent evidence suggests that depressive symptoms and hostility may act together, as interacting factors, to have an effect on the circulating levels of inflammatory markers relevant to coronary artery disease. Further research, however, is needed to clarify the nature of this interaction and to determine whether previous findings extend to older adults. In this report we examined the cross-sectional associations of depressive symptoms, hostility, and their interaction with circulating levels of two such inflammatory markers-interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP).

METHODS

A total of 316 healthy, older adults underwent a blood draw for the assessment of serum IL-6 and CRP and completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. Regression analyses were performed to examine depressive symptoms, hostility, and their interaction as predictors of serum IL-6 and CRP.

RESULTS

After adjustment for demographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors, and health behaviors, we detected depressive symptoms x hostility interactions for serum IL-6 (DeltaR(2) = .027, p < .01) and CRP (DeltaR(2) = .015, p < .05). Simple slope analyses revealed that hostility was positively related to serum IL-6 only among individuals with higher depressive symptoms. The pattern of results was similar for serum CRP, although none of the simple slopes was significant.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that depressive symptoms may moderate the hostility-inflammation relationship such that hostility may augment inflammatory processes relevant to coronary artery disease only in the presence of depressive symptoms. Our results also extend previous findings from younger adults to older adults from the general community.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, 402 North Blackford Street, LD 100E, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA. jstew@iupui.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18256345

Citation

Stewart, Jesse C., et al. "Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Influence of Hostility On Serum Interleukin-6 and C-reactive Protein." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 70, no. 2, 2008, pp. 197-204.
Stewart JC, Janicki-Deverts D, Muldoon MF, et al. Depressive symptoms moderate the influence of hostility on serum interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. Psychosom Med. 2008;70(2):197-204.
Stewart, J. C., Janicki-Deverts, D., Muldoon, M. F., & Kamarck, T. W. (2008). Depressive symptoms moderate the influence of hostility on serum interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. Psychosomatic Medicine, 70(2), 197-204. https://doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181642a0b
Stewart JC, et al. Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Influence of Hostility On Serum Interleukin-6 and C-reactive Protein. Psychosom Med. 2008;70(2):197-204. PubMed PMID: 18256345.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Depressive symptoms moderate the influence of hostility on serum interleukin-6 and C-reactive protein. AU - Stewart,Jesse C, AU - Janicki-Deverts,Denise, AU - Muldoon,Matthew F, AU - Kamarck,Thomas W, Y1 - 2008/02/06/ PY - 2008/2/8/pubmed PY - 2008/4/30/medline PY - 2008/2/8/entrez SP - 197 EP - 204 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 70 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Recent evidence suggests that depressive symptoms and hostility may act together, as interacting factors, to have an effect on the circulating levels of inflammatory markers relevant to coronary artery disease. Further research, however, is needed to clarify the nature of this interaction and to determine whether previous findings extend to older adults. In this report we examined the cross-sectional associations of depressive symptoms, hostility, and their interaction with circulating levels of two such inflammatory markers-interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP). METHODS: A total of 316 healthy, older adults underwent a blood draw for the assessment of serum IL-6 and CRP and completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale. Regression analyses were performed to examine depressive symptoms, hostility, and their interaction as predictors of serum IL-6 and CRP. RESULTS: After adjustment for demographic factors, cardiovascular risk factors, and health behaviors, we detected depressive symptoms x hostility interactions for serum IL-6 (DeltaR(2) = .027, p < .01) and CRP (DeltaR(2) = .015, p < .05). Simple slope analyses revealed that hostility was positively related to serum IL-6 only among individuals with higher depressive symptoms. The pattern of results was similar for serum CRP, although none of the simple slopes was significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that depressive symptoms may moderate the hostility-inflammation relationship such that hostility may augment inflammatory processes relevant to coronary artery disease only in the presence of depressive symptoms. Our results also extend previous findings from younger adults to older adults from the general community. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18256345/Depressive_symptoms_moderate_the_influence_of_hostility_on_serum_interleukin_6_and_C_reactive_protein_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PSY.0b013e3181642a0b DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -