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Levels and major sources of PM2.5 and PM10 in Bangkok Metropolitan Region.
Environ Int. 2008 Jul; 34(5):671-7.EI

Abstract

This research was the first long-term attempt to concurrently measure and identify major sources of both PM(10) and PM(2.5) in Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). Ambient PM(10) and PM(2.5) were evaluated at four monitoring stations and analyzed for elemental compositions, water-soluble ions, and total carbon during February 2002-January 2003. Fifteen chemical elements, four water-soluble ions, and total carbon were analyzed to assist major source identification by a receptor model approach, known as chemical mass balance. PM(10) and PM(2.5) were significantly different (p<0.05) at all sites and 24 h averages were high at traffic location while two separated residential sites were similar. Seasonal difference of PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentrations was distinct between dry and wet seasons. Major source of PM(10) at the traffic site indicated that automobile emissions and biomass burning-related sources contributed approximately 33% each. Automobiles contributed approximately 39 and 22% of PM(10) mass at two residential sites while biomass burning contributed about 36 and 28%. PM(10) from re-suspended soil and cooking sources accounted for 10 to 15% at a residential site. Major sources of PM(2.5) at traffic site were automobile and biomass burning, contributing approximately 32 and 26%, respectively. Biomass burning was the major source of PM(2.5) mass concentrations at residential sites. Meat cooking also accounted for 31% of PM(2.5) mass at a low impact site. Automobile, biomass burning, and road dust were less significant, contributed 10, 6, and 5%, respectively. Major sources identification at some location had difficulty to achieve performance criteria due to limited source profiles. Improved in characterize other sources profiles will help local authority to better air quality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Environmental Health, Institute of Medicine, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand. naresc@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18258301

Citation

Chuersuwan, Nares, et al. "Levels and Major Sources of PM2.5 and PM10 in Bangkok Metropolitan Region." Environment International, vol. 34, no. 5, 2008, pp. 671-7.
Chuersuwan N, Nimrat S, Lekphet S, et al. Levels and major sources of PM2.5 and PM10 in Bangkok Metropolitan Region. Environ Int. 2008;34(5):671-7.
Chuersuwan, N., Nimrat, S., Lekphet, S., & Kerdkumrai, T. (2008). Levels and major sources of PM2.5 and PM10 in Bangkok Metropolitan Region. Environment International, 34(5), 671-7. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2007.12.018
Chuersuwan N, et al. Levels and Major Sources of PM2.5 and PM10 in Bangkok Metropolitan Region. Environ Int. 2008;34(5):671-7. PubMed PMID: 18258301.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Levels and major sources of PM2.5 and PM10 in Bangkok Metropolitan Region. AU - Chuersuwan,Nares, AU - Nimrat,Subuntith, AU - Lekphet,Sukanda, AU - Kerdkumrai,Tida, Y1 - 2008/02/07/ PY - 2008/2/9/pubmed PY - 2008/11/5/medline PY - 2008/2/9/entrez SP - 671 EP - 7 JF - Environment international JO - Environ Int VL - 34 IS - 5 N2 - This research was the first long-term attempt to concurrently measure and identify major sources of both PM(10) and PM(2.5) in Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR). Ambient PM(10) and PM(2.5) were evaluated at four monitoring stations and analyzed for elemental compositions, water-soluble ions, and total carbon during February 2002-January 2003. Fifteen chemical elements, four water-soluble ions, and total carbon were analyzed to assist major source identification by a receptor model approach, known as chemical mass balance. PM(10) and PM(2.5) were significantly different (p<0.05) at all sites and 24 h averages were high at traffic location while two separated residential sites were similar. Seasonal difference of PM(10) and PM(2.5) concentrations was distinct between dry and wet seasons. Major source of PM(10) at the traffic site indicated that automobile emissions and biomass burning-related sources contributed approximately 33% each. Automobiles contributed approximately 39 and 22% of PM(10) mass at two residential sites while biomass burning contributed about 36 and 28%. PM(10) from re-suspended soil and cooking sources accounted for 10 to 15% at a residential site. Major sources of PM(2.5) at traffic site were automobile and biomass burning, contributing approximately 32 and 26%, respectively. Biomass burning was the major source of PM(2.5) mass concentrations at residential sites. Meat cooking also accounted for 31% of PM(2.5) mass at a low impact site. Automobile, biomass burning, and road dust were less significant, contributed 10, 6, and 5%, respectively. Major sources identification at some location had difficulty to achieve performance criteria due to limited source profiles. Improved in characterize other sources profiles will help local authority to better air quality. SN - 0160-4120 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18258301/Levels_and_major_sources_of_PM2_5_and_PM10_in_Bangkok_Metropolitan_Region_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0160-4120(07)00241-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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