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Paroxetine versus placebo for women in midlife after hormone therapy discontinuation.
Am J Med. 2008 Feb; 121(2):159-162.e1.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Concerns about hormone therapy have led many menopausal women to discontinue hormone treatment. This study examines the efficacy of paroxetine controlled-release versus placebo for the treatment of women with vasomotor symptoms after discontinuing hormone therapy.

METHODS

Sixty-four perimenopausal and postmenopausal women without depression or anxiety but reporting vasomotor symptoms after hormone discontinuation entered a 1-week, single-blind, placebo lead-in phase, followed by a 6-week, flexible-dose, double-blind phase with paroxetine controlled-release (12.5-25 mg/d) or placebo. The primary outcome measure was a change in vasomotor symptoms. Other measures included changes in depressive symptoms and overall functioning.

RESULTS

Fifty subjects (paroxetine controlled-release, n=27; placebo, n=23) completed the study. At study entry, subjects had an average of 17 hot flushes per week, had used hormones for more than 5 years (median=66 months, interquartile range=18-120 months), and had discontinued treatment for less than 1 year (median=5 months, interquartile range=2-10 months) before study enrollment. Paroxetine controlled-release was more efficacious than placebo for the alleviation of vasomotor symptoms (mean reduction of 6.1 vs 2.8 hot flashes per week, respectively; P=.03). Depressive symptoms also improved with paroxetine (mean reduction of 3.6 points vs 0.4 points in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale total scores; P=.01).

CONCLUSION

Treatment with paroxetine controlled-release may constitute an efficacious alternative for symptomatic perimenopausal and postmenopausal women after menopausal hormone discontinuation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Perinatal and Reproductive Psychiatry Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA. csoares@mcmaster.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18261506

Citation

Soares, Claudio N., et al. "Paroxetine Versus Placebo for Women in Midlife After Hormone Therapy Discontinuation." The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 121, no. 2, 2008, pp. 159-162.e1.
Soares CN, Joffe H, Viguera AC, et al. Paroxetine versus placebo for women in midlife after hormone therapy discontinuation. Am J Med. 2008;121(2):159-162.e1.
Soares, C. N., Joffe, H., Viguera, A. C., Petrillo, L., Rydzewski, M., Yehezkel, R., Somley, B., & Cohen, L. S. (2008). Paroxetine versus placebo for women in midlife after hormone therapy discontinuation. The American Journal of Medicine, 121(2), 159-e1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjmed.2007.10.007
Soares CN, et al. Paroxetine Versus Placebo for Women in Midlife After Hormone Therapy Discontinuation. Am J Med. 2008;121(2):159-162.e1. PubMed PMID: 18261506.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Paroxetine versus placebo for women in midlife after hormone therapy discontinuation. AU - Soares,Claudio N, AU - Joffe,Hadine, AU - Viguera,Adele C, AU - Petrillo,Laura, AU - Rydzewski,Maya, AU - Yehezkel,Revital, AU - Somley,Brittny, AU - Cohen,Lee S, PY - 2007/07/17/received PY - 2007/09/21/revised PY - 2007/10/02/accepted PY - 2008/2/12/pubmed PY - 2008/2/29/medline PY - 2008/2/12/entrez SP - 159 EP - 162.e1 JF - The American journal of medicine JO - Am J Med VL - 121 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Concerns about hormone therapy have led many menopausal women to discontinue hormone treatment. This study examines the efficacy of paroxetine controlled-release versus placebo for the treatment of women with vasomotor symptoms after discontinuing hormone therapy. METHODS: Sixty-four perimenopausal and postmenopausal women without depression or anxiety but reporting vasomotor symptoms after hormone discontinuation entered a 1-week, single-blind, placebo lead-in phase, followed by a 6-week, flexible-dose, double-blind phase with paroxetine controlled-release (12.5-25 mg/d) or placebo. The primary outcome measure was a change in vasomotor symptoms. Other measures included changes in depressive symptoms and overall functioning. RESULTS: Fifty subjects (paroxetine controlled-release, n=27; placebo, n=23) completed the study. At study entry, subjects had an average of 17 hot flushes per week, had used hormones for more than 5 years (median=66 months, interquartile range=18-120 months), and had discontinued treatment for less than 1 year (median=5 months, interquartile range=2-10 months) before study enrollment. Paroxetine controlled-release was more efficacious than placebo for the alleviation of vasomotor symptoms (mean reduction of 6.1 vs 2.8 hot flashes per week, respectively; P=.03). Depressive symptoms also improved with paroxetine (mean reduction of 3.6 points vs 0.4 points in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale total scores; P=.01). CONCLUSION: Treatment with paroxetine controlled-release may constitute an efficacious alternative for symptomatic perimenopausal and postmenopausal women after menopausal hormone discontinuation. SN - 1555-7162 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18261506/Paroxetine_versus_placebo_for_women_in_midlife_after_hormone_therapy_discontinuation_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9343(07)00998-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -