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Dietary patterns identified using factor analysis and prostate cancer risk: a case control study in Western Australia.
Ann Epidemiol 2008; 18(5):364-70AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Dietary patterns offer an alternative method for analyzing dietary intakes that take into account the whole diet. We investigated empirical dietary patterns and prostate cancer risk in Western Australia (WA) using a population-based case-control study.

METHODS

Incident prostate cancer cases were identified via the WA Cancer Registry. Controls were sourced from the WA electoral roll, frequency matched on age. A food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) estimated usual dietary intake from 10 years earlier. Factor analysis identified dietary patterns in FFQ data. Effects of independent dietary patterns on prostate cancer risk were examined using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders.

RESULTS

A total of 546 cases and 447 controls provided data. Three distinct dietary patterns were identified, which we labeled vegetable, Western, and health-conscious. An increased risk for prostate cancer was observed with the Western pattern, which consisted of high intakes of red and processed meats, fried fish, hamburgers, chips, high-fat milk, and white bread. Men in the highest quartile for Western pattern score had an odds ratio of 1.82 (95% confidence interval 1.15-2.87, trend p = 0.02). Results were similar for aggressive cases and attenuated for non-aggressive cancers.

CONCLUSIONS

A western style diet may lead to increased risks for prostate cancer, especially aggressive prostate cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Australia. Gina.Ambrosini@uwa.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18261927

Citation

Ambrosini, Gina Leslie, et al. "Dietary Patterns Identified Using Factor Analysis and Prostate Cancer Risk: a Case Control Study in Western Australia." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 18, no. 5, 2008, pp. 364-70.
Ambrosini GL, Fritschi L, de Klerk NH, et al. Dietary patterns identified using factor analysis and prostate cancer risk: a case control study in Western Australia. Ann Epidemiol. 2008;18(5):364-70.
Ambrosini, G. L., Fritschi, L., de Klerk, N. H., Mackerras, D., & Leavy, J. (2008). Dietary patterns identified using factor analysis and prostate cancer risk: a case control study in Western Australia. Annals of Epidemiology, 18(5), pp. 364-70. doi:10.1016/j.annepidem.2007.11.010.
Ambrosini GL, et al. Dietary Patterns Identified Using Factor Analysis and Prostate Cancer Risk: a Case Control Study in Western Australia. Ann Epidemiol. 2008;18(5):364-70. PubMed PMID: 18261927.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary patterns identified using factor analysis and prostate cancer risk: a case control study in Western Australia. AU - Ambrosini,Gina Leslie, AU - Fritschi,Lin, AU - de Klerk,Nicholas Hubert, AU - Mackerras,Dorothy, AU - Leavy,Justine, Y1 - 2008/02/08/ PY - 2007/07/17/received PY - 2007/11/21/revised PY - 2007/11/25/accepted PY - 2008/2/12/pubmed PY - 2008/6/20/medline PY - 2008/2/12/entrez SP - 364 EP - 70 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 18 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: Dietary patterns offer an alternative method for analyzing dietary intakes that take into account the whole diet. We investigated empirical dietary patterns and prostate cancer risk in Western Australia (WA) using a population-based case-control study. METHODS: Incident prostate cancer cases were identified via the WA Cancer Registry. Controls were sourced from the WA electoral roll, frequency matched on age. A food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) estimated usual dietary intake from 10 years earlier. Factor analysis identified dietary patterns in FFQ data. Effects of independent dietary patterns on prostate cancer risk were examined using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 546 cases and 447 controls provided data. Three distinct dietary patterns were identified, which we labeled vegetable, Western, and health-conscious. An increased risk for prostate cancer was observed with the Western pattern, which consisted of high intakes of red and processed meats, fried fish, hamburgers, chips, high-fat milk, and white bread. Men in the highest quartile for Western pattern score had an odds ratio of 1.82 (95% confidence interval 1.15-2.87, trend p = 0.02). Results were similar for aggressive cases and attenuated for non-aggressive cancers. CONCLUSIONS: A western style diet may lead to increased risks for prostate cancer, especially aggressive prostate cancer. SN - 1873-2585 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18261927/Dietary_patterns_identified_using_factor_analysis_and_prostate_cancer_risk:_a_case_control_study_in_Western_Australia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(07)00489-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -