Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Body mass index and prostate-specific antigen failure following brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer.
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2008 Aug 01; 71(5):1302-8.IJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer.

PATIENTS AND METHODS

Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT.

RESULTS

Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m(2) (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m(2)), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m(2), 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m(2), and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m(2) or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p = 0.0006).

CONCLUSIONS

Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment strategy in obese patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 100 Blossom Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA. jefstathiou@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18262732

Citation

Efstathiou, Jason A., et al. "Body Mass Index and Prostate-specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer." International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, vol. 71, no. 5, 2008, pp. 1302-8.
Efstathiou JA, Skowronski RY, Coen JJ, et al. Body mass index and prostate-specific antigen failure following brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2008;71(5):1302-8.
Efstathiou, J. A., Skowronski, R. Y., Coen, J. J., Grocela, J. A., Hirsch, A. E., & Zietman, A. L. (2008). Body mass index and prostate-specific antigen failure following brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics, 71(5), 1302-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrobp.2007.11.073
Efstathiou JA, et al. Body Mass Index and Prostate-specific Antigen Failure Following Brachytherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2008 Aug 1;71(5):1302-8. PubMed PMID: 18262732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index and prostate-specific antigen failure following brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. AU - Efstathiou,Jason A, AU - Skowronski,Rafi Y, AU - Coen,John J, AU - Grocela,Joseph A, AU - Hirsch,Ariel E, AU - Zietman,Anthony L, Y1 - 2008/02/11/ PY - 2007/06/05/received PY - 2007/11/08/revised PY - 2007/11/28/accepted PY - 2008/2/12/pubmed PY - 2008/9/5/medline PY - 2008/2/12/entrez SP - 1302 EP - 8 JF - International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics JO - Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys VL - 71 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: Increasing body mass index (BMI) is associated with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure after radical prostatectomy and external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). We investigated whether BMI is associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for clinically localized prostate cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective analyses were conducted on 374 patients undergoing brachytherapy for stage T1c-T2cNXM0 prostate cancer from 1996-2001. Forty-nine patients (13%) received supplemental EBRT and 131 (35%) received androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Height and weight data were available for 353 (94%). Cox regression analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between BMI and PSA failure (nadir + 2 ng/ml definition). Covariates included age, race, preimplantation PSA, Gleason score, T category, percent of prescription dose to 90% of the prostate, use of supplemental EBRT, and ADT. RESULTS: Median age, PSA, and BMI were 66 years (range, 42-80 years), 5.7 ng/ml (range, 0.4-22.6 ng/ml), and 27.1 kg/m(2) (range, 18.2-53.6 kg/m(2)), respectively. After a median follow-up of 6.0 years (range, 3.0-10.2 years), there were 76 PSA recurrences. The BMI was not associated with PSA failure. Six-year PSA failure rates were 30.2% for men with BMI less than 25 kg/m(2), 19.5% for BMI of 25 or greater to less than 30 kg/m(2), and 14.4% for BMI of 30 kg/m(2) or greater (p = 0.19). Results were similar when BMI was analyzed as a continuous variable, using alternative definitions of PSA failure, and excluding patients treated with EBRT and/or ADT. In multivariate analyses, only baseline PSA was significantly associated with shorter time to PSA failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.12; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.20; p = 0.0006). CONCLUSIONS: Unlike after surgery or EBRT, BMI is not associated with PSA failure in men treated with brachytherapy for prostate cancer. This raises the possibility that brachytherapy may be a preferred treatment strategy in obese patients. SN - 0360-3016 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18262732/Body_mass_index_and_prostate_specific_antigen_failure_following_brachytherapy_for_localized_prostate_cancer_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0360-3016(07)04750-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -