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Otoneurological findings in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients.
J Laryngol Otol. 2008 Dec; 122(12):1289-94.JL

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate vestibular function in human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects.

METHODS

We studied vestibular function in 60 human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects reporting dizziness. All three Center for Disease Control and Prevention categories of human immunodeficiency virus infection were represented in the study group (30 patients in class A, 20 in class B and 10 in class C). Subjects had had no previous history of acute vertigo. All subjects underwent: neurotological screening for spontaneous, positional and positioning nystagmus, using head-shaking and head-thrust (Halmagyi) tests; audiometrical examination; and electronystagmography with bithermal stimulation (Freyss' method). The results of the 30 class A subjects were compared with those of 30 human immunodeficiency virus negative patients reporting dizziness.

RESULTS

Abnormal otoneurological findings increased progressively from the A to C categories, particularly regarding increased central damage (3.3 per cent of class A, 35 per cent of class B and 100 per cent of class C subjects). In contrast, the incidence of peripheral vestibular disorders remained almost the same, comparing the three categories (33.3 per cent in class A and 50 per cent in classes B and C subjects). Moreover, a higher number of human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects showed abnormal otoneurological findings, compared with the dizzy, human immunodeficiency virus negative subjects.

CONCLUSIONS

In our opinion, a vestibular disorder may occur in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients as a result of direct viral damage, even in the early phase of infection. Central vestibular damage may be established later on, and may be linked to different causes (e.g. superinfections, vascular causes and drug toxicity).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of ENT, Istitudo di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico San Raffaele Hospital, Vita-Salute University, Milan, Italy. teggi.roberto@hsr.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18267046

Citation

Teggi, R, et al. "Otoneurological Findings in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patients." The Journal of Laryngology and Otology, vol. 122, no. 12, 2008, pp. 1289-94.
Teggi R, Ceserani N, Luce FL, et al. Otoneurological findings in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients. J Laryngol Otol. 2008;122(12):1289-94.
Teggi, R., Ceserani, N., Luce, F. L., Lazzarin, A., & Bussi, M. (2008). Otoneurological findings in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients. The Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 122(12), 1289-94. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0022215107001624
Teggi R, et al. Otoneurological Findings in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patients. J Laryngol Otol. 2008;122(12):1289-94. PubMed PMID: 18267046.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Otoneurological findings in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients. AU - Teggi,R, AU - Ceserani,N, AU - Luce,F Lira, AU - Lazzarin,A, AU - Bussi,M, Y1 - 2008/02/11/ PY - 2008/2/13/pubmed PY - 2009/2/20/medline PY - 2008/2/13/entrez SP - 1289 EP - 94 JF - The Journal of laryngology and otology JO - J Laryngol Otol VL - 122 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular function in human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects. METHODS: We studied vestibular function in 60 human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects reporting dizziness. All three Center for Disease Control and Prevention categories of human immunodeficiency virus infection were represented in the study group (30 patients in class A, 20 in class B and 10 in class C). Subjects had had no previous history of acute vertigo. All subjects underwent: neurotological screening for spontaneous, positional and positioning nystagmus, using head-shaking and head-thrust (Halmagyi) tests; audiometrical examination; and electronystagmography with bithermal stimulation (Freyss' method). The results of the 30 class A subjects were compared with those of 30 human immunodeficiency virus negative patients reporting dizziness. RESULTS: Abnormal otoneurological findings increased progressively from the A to C categories, particularly regarding increased central damage (3.3 per cent of class A, 35 per cent of class B and 100 per cent of class C subjects). In contrast, the incidence of peripheral vestibular disorders remained almost the same, comparing the three categories (33.3 per cent in class A and 50 per cent in classes B and C subjects). Moreover, a higher number of human immunodeficiency virus positive subjects showed abnormal otoneurological findings, compared with the dizzy, human immunodeficiency virus negative subjects. CONCLUSIONS: In our opinion, a vestibular disorder may occur in human immunodeficiency virus positive patients as a result of direct viral damage, even in the early phase of infection. Central vestibular damage may be established later on, and may be linked to different causes (e.g. superinfections, vascular causes and drug toxicity). SN - 1748-5460 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18267046/Otoneurological_findings_in_human_immunodeficiency_virus_positive_patients_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0022215107001624/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -