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Ventilation strategy using low tidal volumes, recruitment maneuvers, and high positive end-expiratory pressure for acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: a randomized controlled trial.
JAMA. 2008 Feb 13; 299(6):637-45.JAMA

Abstract

CONTEXT

Low-tidal-volume ventilation reduces mortality in critically ill patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Instituting additional strategies to open collapsed lung tissue may further reduce mortality.

OBJECTIVE

To compare an established low-tidal-volume ventilation strategy with an experimental strategy based on the original "open-lung approach," combining low tidal volume, lung recruitment maneuvers, and high positive-end-expiratory pressure.

DESIGN AND SETTING

Randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation and blinded data analysis conducted between August 2000 and March 2006 in 30 intensive care units in Canada, Australia, and Saudi Arabia.

PATIENTS

Nine hundred eighty-three consecutive patients with acute lung injury and a ratio of arterial oxygen tension to inspired oxygen fraction not exceeding 250.

INTERVENTIONS

The control strategy included target tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight, plateau airway pressures not exceeding 30 cm H2O, and conventional levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (n = 508). The experimental strategy included target tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight, plateau pressures not exceeding 40 cm H2O, recruitment maneuvers, and higher positive end-expiratory pressures (n = 475).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

All-cause hospital mortality.

RESULTS

Eighty-five percent of the 983 study patients met criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome at enrollment. Tidal volumes remained similar in the 2 groups, and mean positive end-expiratory pressures were 14.6 (SD, 3.4) cm H2O in the experimental group vs 9.8 (SD, 2.7) cm H2O among controls during the first 72 hours (P < .001). All-cause hospital mortality rates were 36.4% and 40.4%, respectively (relative risk [RR], 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77-1.05; P = .19). Barotrauma rates were 11.2% and 9.1% (RR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.83-1.75; P = .33). The experimental group had lower rates of refractory hypoxemia (4.6% vs 10.2%; RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P = .01), death with refractory hypoxemia (4.2% vs 8.9%; RR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.34-0.93; P = .03), and previously defined eligible use of rescue therapies (5.1% vs 9.3%; RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.99; P = .045).

CONCLUSIONS

For patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a multifaceted protocolized ventilation strategy designed to recruit and open the lung resulted in no significant difference in all-cause hospital mortality or barotrauma compared with an established low-tidal-volume protocolized ventilation strategy. This "open-lung" strategy did appear to improve secondary end points related to hypoxemia and use of rescue therapies.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00182195.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. meadema@hhsc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18270352

Citation

Meade, Maureen O., et al. "Ventilation Strategy Using Low Tidal Volumes, Recruitment Maneuvers, and High Positive End-expiratory Pressure for Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: a Randomized Controlled Trial." JAMA, vol. 299, no. 6, 2008, pp. 637-45.
Meade MO, Cook DJ, Guyatt GH, et al. Ventilation strategy using low tidal volumes, recruitment maneuvers, and high positive end-expiratory pressure for acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA. 2008;299(6):637-45.
Meade, M. O., Cook, D. J., Guyatt, G. H., Slutsky, A. S., Arabi, Y. M., Cooper, D. J., Davies, A. R., Hand, L. E., Zhou, Q., Thabane, L., Austin, P., Lapinsky, S., Baxter, A., Russell, J., Skrobik, Y., Ronco, J. J., & Stewart, T. E. (2008). Ventilation strategy using low tidal volumes, recruitment maneuvers, and high positive end-expiratory pressure for acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA, 299(6), 637-45. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.299.6.637
Meade MO, et al. Ventilation Strategy Using Low Tidal Volumes, Recruitment Maneuvers, and High Positive End-expiratory Pressure for Acute Lung Injury and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: a Randomized Controlled Trial. JAMA. 2008 Feb 13;299(6):637-45. PubMed PMID: 18270352.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ventilation strategy using low tidal volumes, recruitment maneuvers, and high positive end-expiratory pressure for acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome: a randomized controlled trial. AU - Meade,Maureen O, AU - Cook,Deborah J, AU - Guyatt,Gordon H, AU - Slutsky,Arthur S, AU - Arabi,Yaseen M, AU - Cooper,D James, AU - Davies,Andrew R, AU - Hand,Lori E, AU - Zhou,Qi, AU - Thabane,Lehana, AU - Austin,Peggy, AU - Lapinsky,Stephen, AU - Baxter,Alan, AU - Russell,James, AU - Skrobik,Yoanna, AU - Ronco,Juan J, AU - Stewart,Thomas E, AU - ,, PY - 2008/2/14/pubmed PY - 2008/2/15/medline PY - 2008/2/14/entrez SP - 637 EP - 45 JF - JAMA JO - JAMA VL - 299 IS - 6 N2 - CONTEXT: Low-tidal-volume ventilation reduces mortality in critically ill patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Instituting additional strategies to open collapsed lung tissue may further reduce mortality. OBJECTIVE: To compare an established low-tidal-volume ventilation strategy with an experimental strategy based on the original "open-lung approach," combining low tidal volume, lung recruitment maneuvers, and high positive-end-expiratory pressure. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized controlled trial with concealed allocation and blinded data analysis conducted between August 2000 and March 2006 in 30 intensive care units in Canada, Australia, and Saudi Arabia. PATIENTS: Nine hundred eighty-three consecutive patients with acute lung injury and a ratio of arterial oxygen tension to inspired oxygen fraction not exceeding 250. INTERVENTIONS: The control strategy included target tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight, plateau airway pressures not exceeding 30 cm H2O, and conventional levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (n = 508). The experimental strategy included target tidal volumes of 6 mL/kg of predicted body weight, plateau pressures not exceeding 40 cm H2O, recruitment maneuvers, and higher positive end-expiratory pressures (n = 475). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: All-cause hospital mortality. RESULTS: Eighty-five percent of the 983 study patients met criteria for acute respiratory distress syndrome at enrollment. Tidal volumes remained similar in the 2 groups, and mean positive end-expiratory pressures were 14.6 (SD, 3.4) cm H2O in the experimental group vs 9.8 (SD, 2.7) cm H2O among controls during the first 72 hours (P < .001). All-cause hospital mortality rates were 36.4% and 40.4%, respectively (relative risk [RR], 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.77-1.05; P = .19). Barotrauma rates were 11.2% and 9.1% (RR, 1.21; 95% CI, 0.83-1.75; P = .33). The experimental group had lower rates of refractory hypoxemia (4.6% vs 10.2%; RR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.34-0.86; P = .01), death with refractory hypoxemia (4.2% vs 8.9%; RR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.34-0.93; P = .03), and previously defined eligible use of rescue therapies (5.1% vs 9.3%; RR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.99; P = .045). CONCLUSIONS: For patients with acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, a multifaceted protocolized ventilation strategy designed to recruit and open the lung resulted in no significant difference in all-cause hospital mortality or barotrauma compared with an established low-tidal-volume protocolized ventilation strategy. This "open-lung" strategy did appear to improve secondary end points related to hypoxemia and use of rescue therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00182195. SN - 1538-3598 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18270352/Ventilation_strategy_using_low_tidal_volumes_recruitment_maneuvers_and_high_positive_end_expiratory_pressure_for_acute_lung_injury_and_acute_respiratory_distress_syndrome:_a_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/10.1001/jama.299.6.637 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -