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Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: changes in pattern and distribution of disease over time.
Radiology. 2008 Apr; 247(1):251-9.R

Abstract

PURPOSE

To retrospectively assess the change in disease pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) findings seen at thin-section computed tomography (CT) at long-term follow-up and to compare the same with initial findings at CT.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The study included 48 patients (28 men, 20 women; mean age, 57.5 years) with biopsy-proved NSIP (n = 23) or IPF (n = 25) who underwent CT at initial diagnosis and at follow-up 34-155 months later. The CT scans were randomized and reviewed by two independent thoracic radiologists for pattern and distribution of ground-glass opacity (GGO), reticulation, traction bronchiectasis and bronchiolectasis, and honeycombing. Statistical analysis was performed by using nonparametric methods and univariate logistic regression.

RESULTS

Follow-up CT in patients with NSIP showed marked decrease in the extent of GGO, increase in reticulation, and a greater likelihood of peripheral distribution (all P < .05). At presentation, the CT findings were interpreted as suggestive of NSIP in 18 of 23 patients with NSIP and indeterminate or suggestive of IPF in five. In five (28%) of 18 patients with initial findings suggestive of NSIP, the follow-up CT scans were interpreted as more suggestive of IPF. No CT features seen at presentation allowed distinction between patients with NSIP that maintained an NSIP pattern at follow-up and those that progressed to an IPF pattern.

CONCLUSION

At follow-up CT, 28% of patients with initial CT findings suggestive of NSIP progressed to findings suggestive of IPF. Similar initial CT findings for NSIP may have different imaging outcomes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Radiology, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, 3350-950 W 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC, Canada V5Z 4E3. isabela.silva@vch.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18270375

Citation

Silva, C Isabela S., et al. "Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Changes in Pattern and Distribution of Disease Over Time." Radiology, vol. 247, no. 1, 2008, pp. 251-9.
Silva CI, Müller NL, Hansell DM, et al. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: changes in pattern and distribution of disease over time. Radiology. 2008;247(1):251-9.
Silva, C. I., Müller, N. L., Hansell, D. M., Lee, K. S., Nicholson, A. G., & Wells, A. U. (2008). Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: changes in pattern and distribution of disease over time. Radiology, 247(1), 251-9. https://doi.org/10.1148/radiol.2471070369
Silva CI, et al. Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Changes in Pattern and Distribution of Disease Over Time. Radiology. 2008;247(1):251-9. PubMed PMID: 18270375.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: changes in pattern and distribution of disease over time. AU - Silva,C Isabela S, AU - Müller,Nestor L, AU - Hansell,David M, AU - Lee,Kyung S, AU - Nicholson,Andrew G, AU - Wells,Athol U, Y1 - 2008/02/12/ PY - 2008/2/14/pubmed PY - 2008/4/26/medline PY - 2008/2/14/entrez SP - 251 EP - 9 JF - Radiology JO - Radiology VL - 247 IS - 1 N2 - PURPOSE: To retrospectively assess the change in disease pattern of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) findings seen at thin-section computed tomography (CT) at long-term follow-up and to compare the same with initial findings at CT. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study included 48 patients (28 men, 20 women; mean age, 57.5 years) with biopsy-proved NSIP (n = 23) or IPF (n = 25) who underwent CT at initial diagnosis and at follow-up 34-155 months later. The CT scans were randomized and reviewed by two independent thoracic radiologists for pattern and distribution of ground-glass opacity (GGO), reticulation, traction bronchiectasis and bronchiolectasis, and honeycombing. Statistical analysis was performed by using nonparametric methods and univariate logistic regression. RESULTS: Follow-up CT in patients with NSIP showed marked decrease in the extent of GGO, increase in reticulation, and a greater likelihood of peripheral distribution (all P < .05). At presentation, the CT findings were interpreted as suggestive of NSIP in 18 of 23 patients with NSIP and indeterminate or suggestive of IPF in five. In five (28%) of 18 patients with initial findings suggestive of NSIP, the follow-up CT scans were interpreted as more suggestive of IPF. No CT features seen at presentation allowed distinction between patients with NSIP that maintained an NSIP pattern at follow-up and those that progressed to an IPF pattern. CONCLUSION: At follow-up CT, 28% of patients with initial CT findings suggestive of NSIP progressed to findings suggestive of IPF. Similar initial CT findings for NSIP may have different imaging outcomes. SN - 1527-1315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18270375/Nonspecific_interstitial_pneumonia_and_idiopathic_pulmonary_fibrosis:_changes_in_pattern_and_distribution_of_disease_over_time_ L2 - https://pubs.rsna.org/doi/10.1148/radiol.2471070369?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -