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Total daily energy expenditure in black and white, lean and obese South African women.
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009 May; 63(5):667-73.EJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

In South Africa (SA), the prevalence of obesity in women is 56%, with black women being most at risk (62%). Studies in the United States have demonstrated ethnic differences in resting (REE) and total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) between African American (AA) and their white counterparts. We investigated whether differences in EE exist in black and white SA women, explaining, in part, the ethnic obesity prevalence differences.

SUBJECTS/METHODS

We measured REE, TDEE and physical activity EE (PAEE) in lean (BMI <25 kg m(-2)) and obese (BMI >30 kg m(-2)) SA women (N=44, 30+/-6 year). REE, TDEE, PAEE and total awake EE were measured during a 21 h stay in a respiration chamber.

RESULTS

Black and white subjects within obese and lean groups were not significantly different for age, mass, BMI and % body fat. However, fat-free mass (kg FFM) was consistently lower in the black women (P<0.01) in both weight groups. After adjusting EE measurements for differences in FFM, REE was not significantly different for either body weight or ethnicity, although 24 h TDEE (kJ) was significantly greater in the obese women (P<0.01) and white women (P<0.05). Total awake non-PAEE was not significantly different for either groups, while total awake time was only significantly lower for the lean groups (P<0.01). Total PAEE (kJ min(-1)) was significantly lower in the lean (P<0.001) and black groups (P<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

In this sample of matched, lean and obese, black and white SA women, differences in TDEE were largely explained by ethnic differences in PAEE, and were not as a result of ethnic differences in REE.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MRC/UCT Research Unit for Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, Department of Human Biology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. Ldugas@lumc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18270522

Citation

Dugas, L R., et al. "Total Daily Energy Expenditure in Black and White, Lean and Obese South African Women." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 63, no. 5, 2009, pp. 667-73.
Dugas LR, Cohen R, Carstens MT, et al. Total daily energy expenditure in black and white, lean and obese South African women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(5):667-73.
Dugas, L. R., Cohen, R., Carstens, M. T., Schoffelen, P. F., Luke, A., Durazo-Arvizu, R. A., Goedecke, J. H., Levitt, N. S., & Lambert, E. V. (2009). Total daily energy expenditure in black and white, lean and obese South African women. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 63(5), 667-73. https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2008.8
Dugas LR, et al. Total Daily Energy Expenditure in Black and White, Lean and Obese South African Women. Eur J Clin Nutr. 2009;63(5):667-73. PubMed PMID: 18270522.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total daily energy expenditure in black and white, lean and obese South African women. AU - Dugas,L R, AU - Cohen,R, AU - Carstens,M T, AU - Schoffelen,P F M, AU - Luke,A, AU - Durazo-Arvizu,R A, AU - Goedecke,J H, AU - Levitt,N S, AU - Lambert,E V, Y1 - 2008/02/13/ PY - 2008/2/14/pubmed PY - 2009/6/17/medline PY - 2008/2/14/entrez SP - 667 EP - 73 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 63 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: In South Africa (SA), the prevalence of obesity in women is 56%, with black women being most at risk (62%). Studies in the United States have demonstrated ethnic differences in resting (REE) and total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) between African American (AA) and their white counterparts. We investigated whether differences in EE exist in black and white SA women, explaining, in part, the ethnic obesity prevalence differences. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We measured REE, TDEE and physical activity EE (PAEE) in lean (BMI <25 kg m(-2)) and obese (BMI >30 kg m(-2)) SA women (N=44, 30+/-6 year). REE, TDEE, PAEE and total awake EE were measured during a 21 h stay in a respiration chamber. RESULTS: Black and white subjects within obese and lean groups were not significantly different for age, mass, BMI and % body fat. However, fat-free mass (kg FFM) was consistently lower in the black women (P<0.01) in both weight groups. After adjusting EE measurements for differences in FFM, REE was not significantly different for either body weight or ethnicity, although 24 h TDEE (kJ) was significantly greater in the obese women (P<0.01) and white women (P<0.05). Total awake non-PAEE was not significantly different for either groups, while total awake time was only significantly lower for the lean groups (P<0.01). Total PAEE (kJ min(-1)) was significantly lower in the lean (P<0.001) and black groups (P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of matched, lean and obese, black and white SA women, differences in TDEE were largely explained by ethnic differences in PAEE, and were not as a result of ethnic differences in REE. SN - 1476-5640 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18270522/Total_daily_energy_expenditure_in_black_and_white_lean_and_obese_South_African_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/ejcn.2008.8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -