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Utility of diagnostic tests for and medical treatment of pulmonary blastomycosis in dogs: 125 cases (1989-2006).
J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Jan 15; 232(2):222-7.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare results of the most common diagnostic tests for pulmonary blastomycosis in dogs, identify factors associated with outcome, and determine response to various antifungal treatment protocols.

DESIGN

Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS

125 dogs with pulmonary blastomycosis.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed, and information was obtained regarding diagnostic methods, results of routine laboratory testing, and radiographic response to antifungal treatment.

RESULTS

79 dogs survived, 38 died, and 8 were euthanized. Transthoracic fine-needle aspiration and transtracheal lavage were the most common diagnostic methods. Results of an agar gel immunodiffusion test for antibodies against Blastomyces dermatitidis were negative in 12 of 24 (50%) dogs. Only 3 of 94 (3.2%) dogs in which cytologic or histologic examination or bacterial culture of pulmonary samples were performed had any evidence of concurrent bacterial infection. The half-time for radiographic resolution of pulmonary infiltrates did not vary significantly with antifungal treatment, and use of a loading dosage of itraconazole was not associated with significant improvements in outcome or time to disease resolution. Dogs that died had a higher number of band neutrophils at initial examination, compared with those that survived.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that the agar gel immunodiffusion test should not be used as the sole diagnostic test for pulmonary blastomycosis in dogs, that concurrent bacterial pneumonia was uncommon in dogs with pulmonary blastomycosis, and that the rate with which pulmonary infiltrates resolved did not vary significantly among antifungal treatments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN 55108, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18275389

Citation

Crews, Laura J., et al. "Utility of Diagnostic Tests for and Medical Treatment of Pulmonary Blastomycosis in Dogs: 125 Cases (1989-2006)." Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol. 232, no. 2, 2008, pp. 222-7.
Crews LJ, Feeney DA, Jessen CR, et al. Utility of diagnostic tests for and medical treatment of pulmonary blastomycosis in dogs: 125 cases (1989-2006). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008;232(2):222-7.
Crews, L. J., Feeney, D. A., Jessen, C. R., Newman, A. B., & Sharkey, L. C. (2008). Utility of diagnostic tests for and medical treatment of pulmonary blastomycosis in dogs: 125 cases (1989-2006). Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, 232(2), 222-7. https://doi.org/10.2460/javma.232.2.222
Crews LJ, et al. Utility of Diagnostic Tests for and Medical Treatment of Pulmonary Blastomycosis in Dogs: 125 Cases (1989-2006). J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2008 Jan 15;232(2):222-7. PubMed PMID: 18275389.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Utility of diagnostic tests for and medical treatment of pulmonary blastomycosis in dogs: 125 cases (1989-2006). AU - Crews,Laura J, AU - Feeney,Daniel A, AU - Jessen,Carl R, AU - Newman,Allison B, AU - Sharkey,Leslie C, PY - 2008/2/16/pubmed PY - 2008/3/11/medline PY - 2008/2/16/entrez SP - 222 EP - 7 JF - Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association JO - J Am Vet Med Assoc VL - 232 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare results of the most common diagnostic tests for pulmonary blastomycosis in dogs, identify factors associated with outcome, and determine response to various antifungal treatment protocols. DESIGN: Retrospective case series. ANIMALS: 125 dogs with pulmonary blastomycosis. PROCEDURES: Medical records were reviewed, and information was obtained regarding diagnostic methods, results of routine laboratory testing, and radiographic response to antifungal treatment. RESULTS: 79 dogs survived, 38 died, and 8 were euthanized. Transthoracic fine-needle aspiration and transtracheal lavage were the most common diagnostic methods. Results of an agar gel immunodiffusion test for antibodies against Blastomyces dermatitidis were negative in 12 of 24 (50%) dogs. Only 3 of 94 (3.2%) dogs in which cytologic or histologic examination or bacterial culture of pulmonary samples were performed had any evidence of concurrent bacterial infection. The half-time for radiographic resolution of pulmonary infiltrates did not vary significantly with antifungal treatment, and use of a loading dosage of itraconazole was not associated with significant improvements in outcome or time to disease resolution. Dogs that died had a higher number of band neutrophils at initial examination, compared with those that survived. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Results suggested that the agar gel immunodiffusion test should not be used as the sole diagnostic test for pulmonary blastomycosis in dogs, that concurrent bacterial pneumonia was uncommon in dogs with pulmonary blastomycosis, and that the rate with which pulmonary infiltrates resolved did not vary significantly among antifungal treatments. SN - 0003-1488 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18275389/Utility_of_diagnostic_tests_for_and_medical_treatment_of_pulmonary_blastomycosis_in_dogs:_125_cases__1989_2006__ L2 - https://avmajournals.avma.org/doi/10.2460/javma.232.2.222?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -