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Potency of delta 9-THC and other cannabinoids in cannabis in England in 2005: implications for psychoactivity and pharmacology.
J Forensic Sci. 2008 Jan; 53(1):90-4.JF

Abstract

Gas chromatography was used to study the cannabinoid content ("potency") of illicit cannabis seized by police in England in 2004/5. Of the four hundred and fifty two samples, indoor-grown unpollinated female cannabis ("sinsemilla") was the most frequent form, followed by resin (hashish) and imported outdoor-grown herbal cannabis (marijuana). The content of the psychoactive cannabinoid delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) varied widely. The median THC content of herbal cannabis and resin was 2.1% and 3.5%, respectively. The median 13.9% THC content of sinsemilla was significantly higher than that recorded in the UK in 1996/8. In sinsemilla and imported herbal cannabis, the content of the antipsychotic cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) was extremely low. In resin, however, the average CBD content exceeded that of THC, and the relative proportions of the two cannabinoids varied widely between samples. The increases in average THC content and relative popularity of sinsemilla cannabis, combined with the absence of the anti-psychotic cannabinoid CBD, suggest that the current trends in cannabis use pose an increasing risk to those users susceptible to the harmful psychological effects associated with high doses of THC.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacy, King's College London, 150 Stamford Street, London SE1 9NH, United Kingdom. david.j.potter@kcl.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18279244

Citation

Potter, David J., et al. "Potency of Delta 9-THC and Other Cannabinoids in Cannabis in England in 2005: Implications for Psychoactivity and Pharmacology." Journal of Forensic Sciences, vol. 53, no. 1, 2008, pp. 90-4.
Potter DJ, Clark P, Brown MB. Potency of delta 9-THC and other cannabinoids in cannabis in England in 2005: implications for psychoactivity and pharmacology. J Forensic Sci. 2008;53(1):90-4.
Potter, D. J., Clark, P., & Brown, M. B. (2008). Potency of delta 9-THC and other cannabinoids in cannabis in England in 2005: implications for psychoactivity and pharmacology. Journal of Forensic Sciences, 53(1), 90-4. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1556-4029.2007.00603.x
Potter DJ, Clark P, Brown MB. Potency of Delta 9-THC and Other Cannabinoids in Cannabis in England in 2005: Implications for Psychoactivity and Pharmacology. J Forensic Sci. 2008;53(1):90-4. PubMed PMID: 18279244.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Potency of delta 9-THC and other cannabinoids in cannabis in England in 2005: implications for psychoactivity and pharmacology. AU - Potter,David J, AU - Clark,Peter, AU - Brown,Marc B, PY - 2008/2/19/pubmed PY - 2008/2/19/medline PY - 2008/2/19/entrez SP - 90 EP - 4 JF - Journal of forensic sciences JO - J Forensic Sci VL - 53 IS - 1 N2 - Gas chromatography was used to study the cannabinoid content ("potency") of illicit cannabis seized by police in England in 2004/5. Of the four hundred and fifty two samples, indoor-grown unpollinated female cannabis ("sinsemilla") was the most frequent form, followed by resin (hashish) and imported outdoor-grown herbal cannabis (marijuana). The content of the psychoactive cannabinoid delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) varied widely. The median THC content of herbal cannabis and resin was 2.1% and 3.5%, respectively. The median 13.9% THC content of sinsemilla was significantly higher than that recorded in the UK in 1996/8. In sinsemilla and imported herbal cannabis, the content of the antipsychotic cannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) was extremely low. In resin, however, the average CBD content exceeded that of THC, and the relative proportions of the two cannabinoids varied widely between samples. The increases in average THC content and relative popularity of sinsemilla cannabis, combined with the absence of the anti-psychotic cannabinoid CBD, suggest that the current trends in cannabis use pose an increasing risk to those users susceptible to the harmful psychological effects associated with high doses of THC. SN - 0022-1198 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18279244/Potency_of_delta_9_THC_and_other_cannabinoids_in_cannabis_in_England_in_2005:_implications_for_psychoactivity_and_pharmacology_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1556-4029.2007.00603.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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