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Vitamin E supplementation may transiently increase tuberculosis risk in males who smoke heavily and have high dietary vitamin C intake.

Abstract

Vitamin E and beta-carotene affect the immune function and might influence the predisposition of man to infections. To examine whether vitamin E or beta-carotene supplementation affects tuberculosis risk, we analysed data of the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC)Study, a randomised controlled trial which examined the effects of vitamin E (50 mg/d) and beta-carotene (20 mg/d) on lung cancer. The trial was conducted in the general community in Finland in 1985-93; the intervention lasted for 6.1 years (median). The ATBC Study cohort consists of 29,023 males aged 50-69 years, smoking at baseline, with no tuberculosis diagnosis prior to randomisation. Vitamin E supplementation had no overall effect on the incidence of tuberculosis (risk ratio (RR) = 1.18; 95% CI 0.87, 1.59) nor had beta-carotene (RR = 1.07; 95% CI 0.80, 1.45). Nevertheless, dietary vitamin C intake significantly modified the vitamin E effect. Among participants who obtained 90 mg/d or more of vitamin Cin foods (n 13,502), vitamin E supplementation increased tuberculosis risk by 72 (95% CI 4, 185)%. This effect was restricted to participants who smoked heavily. Finally, in participants not supplemented with vitamin E, dietary vitamin C had a negative association with tuberculosis risk so that the adjusted risk was 60 (95% CI 16, 81)% lower in the highest intake quartile compared with the lowest. Our finding that vitamin E seemed to transiently increase the risk of tuberculosis in those who smoked heavily and had high dietary vitamin C intake should increase caution towards vitamin E supplementation for improving the immune system.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Mannerheimintie 172, POB 41, Helsinki FIN-00014, Finland. harri.hemila@helsinki.fi

    Source

    The British journal of nutrition 100:4 2008 Oct pg 896-902

    MeSH

    Aged
    Antioxidants
    Ascorbic Acid
    Diet
    Dietary Supplements
    Follow-Up Studies
    Fruit
    Humans
    Incidence
    Lung Neoplasms
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Risk Assessment
    Smoking
    Tuberculosis
    Vegetables
    Vitamin E
    Vitamins
    beta Carotene

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study
    Randomized Controlled Trial

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    18279551

    Citation

    Hemilä, Harri, and Jaakko Kaprio. "Vitamin E Supplementation May Transiently Increase Tuberculosis Risk in Males Who Smoke Heavily and Have High Dietary Vitamin C Intake." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 100, no. 4, 2008, pp. 896-902.
    Hemilä H, Kaprio J. Vitamin E supplementation may transiently increase tuberculosis risk in males who smoke heavily and have high dietary vitamin C intake. Br J Nutr. 2008;100(4):896-902.
    Hemilä, H., & Kaprio, J. (2008). Vitamin E supplementation may transiently increase tuberculosis risk in males who smoke heavily and have high dietary vitamin C intake. The British Journal of Nutrition, 100(4), pp. 896-902. doi:10.1017/S0007114508923709.
    Hemilä H, Kaprio J. Vitamin E Supplementation May Transiently Increase Tuberculosis Risk in Males Who Smoke Heavily and Have High Dietary Vitamin C Intake. Br J Nutr. 2008;100(4):896-902. PubMed PMID: 18279551.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin E supplementation may transiently increase tuberculosis risk in males who smoke heavily and have high dietary vitamin C intake. AU - Hemilä,Harri, AU - Kaprio,Jaakko, Y1 - 2008/02/18/ PY - 2008/2/19/pubmed PY - 2009/5/14/medline PY - 2008/2/19/entrez SP - 896 EP - 902 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 100 IS - 4 N2 - Vitamin E and beta-carotene affect the immune function and might influence the predisposition of man to infections. To examine whether vitamin E or beta-carotene supplementation affects tuberculosis risk, we analysed data of the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC)Study, a randomised controlled trial which examined the effects of vitamin E (50 mg/d) and beta-carotene (20 mg/d) on lung cancer. The trial was conducted in the general community in Finland in 1985-93; the intervention lasted for 6.1 years (median). The ATBC Study cohort consists of 29,023 males aged 50-69 years, smoking at baseline, with no tuberculosis diagnosis prior to randomisation. Vitamin E supplementation had no overall effect on the incidence of tuberculosis (risk ratio (RR) = 1.18; 95% CI 0.87, 1.59) nor had beta-carotene (RR = 1.07; 95% CI 0.80, 1.45). Nevertheless, dietary vitamin C intake significantly modified the vitamin E effect. Among participants who obtained 90 mg/d or more of vitamin Cin foods (n 13,502), vitamin E supplementation increased tuberculosis risk by 72 (95% CI 4, 185)%. This effect was restricted to participants who smoked heavily. Finally, in participants not supplemented with vitamin E, dietary vitamin C had a negative association with tuberculosis risk so that the adjusted risk was 60 (95% CI 16, 81)% lower in the highest intake quartile compared with the lowest. Our finding that vitamin E seemed to transiently increase the risk of tuberculosis in those who smoked heavily and had high dietary vitamin C intake should increase caution towards vitamin E supplementation for improving the immune system. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18279551/Vitamin_E_supplementation_may_transiently_increase_tuberculosis_risk_in_males_who_smoke_heavily_and_have_high_dietary_vitamin_C_intake_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114508923709/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -