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Relationships between different types of fruit and vegetable consumption and serum concentrations of antioxidant vitamins.
Br J Nutr 2008; 100(3):633-41BJ

Abstract

Increased fruit and vegetable consumption has become a health priority in many countries. Therefore, data investigating the influence of different types of fruits and vegetables on serum antioxidant levels would be useful. The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and vitamin serum antioxidant concentrations. Specific fruit and vegetable groups are evaluated. A total of 3521 subjects (1487 men and 2034 women), aged 35-60 years, participating in the SU.VI.MAX cohort were included in this study. Blood samples of participants were analysed for beta-carotene, vitamin C and alpha-tocopherol. Each subject had completed at least six dietary records during the first 2 years of the study. It was found that women had higher mean beta-carotene and vitamin C serum concentrations than men, but lower alpha-tocopherol serum concentrations. Serum beta-carotene and vitamin C concentrations were positively correlated with consumption of both fruit and vegetables, as well as with most of the fruit and vegetable groups tested. These relationships persisted after adjustment for confounding factors. Regression analysis showed a linear dose-response relationship. Root vegetables and citrus fruits were particularly associated with beta-carotene serum status as were citrus fruits for vitamin C. Fruit and vegetable consumption was either not or weakly associated with alpha-tocopherol serum concentrations. These results describe antioxidant serum concentrations according to fruit and vegetable consumption in a large sample and support the findings of previous studies involving a more limited number of subjects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

INSERM, U557, Bobigny, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18279554

Citation

Dauchet, Luc, et al. "Relationships Between Different Types of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Serum Concentrations of Antioxidant Vitamins." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 100, no. 3, 2008, pp. 633-41.
Dauchet L, Péneau S, Bertrais S, et al. Relationships between different types of fruit and vegetable consumption and serum concentrations of antioxidant vitamins. Br J Nutr. 2008;100(3):633-41.
Dauchet, L., Péneau, S., Bertrais, S., Vergnaud, A. C., Estaquio, C., Kesse-Guyot, E., ... Hercberg, S. (2008). Relationships between different types of fruit and vegetable consumption and serum concentrations of antioxidant vitamins. The British Journal of Nutrition, 100(3), pp. 633-41. doi:10.1017/S000711450892170X.
Dauchet L, et al. Relationships Between Different Types of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Serum Concentrations of Antioxidant Vitamins. Br J Nutr. 2008;100(3):633-41. PubMed PMID: 18279554.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationships between different types of fruit and vegetable consumption and serum concentrations of antioxidant vitamins. AU - Dauchet,Luc, AU - Péneau,Sandrine, AU - Bertrais,Sandrine, AU - Vergnaud,Anne Claire, AU - Estaquio,Carla, AU - Kesse-Guyot,Emmanuelle, AU - Czernichow,Sébastien, AU - Favier,Alain, AU - Faure,Henri, AU - Galan,Pilar, AU - Hercberg,Serge, Y1 - 2008/02/18/ PY - 2008/2/19/pubmed PY - 2009/2/27/medline PY - 2008/2/19/entrez SP - 633 EP - 41 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 100 IS - 3 N2 - Increased fruit and vegetable consumption has become a health priority in many countries. Therefore, data investigating the influence of different types of fruits and vegetables on serum antioxidant levels would be useful. The objective of the study was to assess the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and vitamin serum antioxidant concentrations. Specific fruit and vegetable groups are evaluated. A total of 3521 subjects (1487 men and 2034 women), aged 35-60 years, participating in the SU.VI.MAX cohort were included in this study. Blood samples of participants were analysed for beta-carotene, vitamin C and alpha-tocopherol. Each subject had completed at least six dietary records during the first 2 years of the study. It was found that women had higher mean beta-carotene and vitamin C serum concentrations than men, but lower alpha-tocopherol serum concentrations. Serum beta-carotene and vitamin C concentrations were positively correlated with consumption of both fruit and vegetables, as well as with most of the fruit and vegetable groups tested. These relationships persisted after adjustment for confounding factors. Regression analysis showed a linear dose-response relationship. Root vegetables and citrus fruits were particularly associated with beta-carotene serum status as were citrus fruits for vitamin C. Fruit and vegetable consumption was either not or weakly associated with alpha-tocopherol serum concentrations. These results describe antioxidant serum concentrations according to fruit and vegetable consumption in a large sample and support the findings of previous studies involving a more limited number of subjects. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18279554/Relationships_between_different_types_of_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_and_serum_concentrations_of_antioxidant_vitamins_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S000711450892170X/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -