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US Civilian Smallpox Preparedness and Response Program, 2003.
Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Mar 15; 46 Suppl 3:S157-67.CI

Abstract

Variola virus, the cause of smallpox disease, has been deemed a possible bioterrorism agent. Since November 2001, federal, state, and local public health partners implemented activities to prepare for a possible smallpox outbreak. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) produced and delivered training and educational materials for smallpox preparedness in many formats, developed detailed smallpox vaccine information statements about vaccine contraindications and vaccination site care, and established mechanisms to monitor and respond to adverse events after smallpox vaccination. The last included enhancements to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, a pregnancy registry for inadvertently vaccinated pregnant women, and a Clinician Telephone Information Line to collect reports about adverse events. The civilian responder vaccination program was conducted with rigorous safety procedures, and few historically recognized adverse events were observed. However, myocarditis and/or pericarditis was newly recognized as an adverse event caused by the New York City Board of Health vaccinia vaccine strain. This smallpox preparedness program put into place a number of measures to advance the United States' readiness for a smallpox outbreak that have assisted in preparedness for other threats.

Authors+Show Affiliations

National Vaccine Program Office, US Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, DC, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

18284355

Citation

Strikas, Raymond A., et al. "US Civilian Smallpox Preparedness and Response Program, 2003." Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, vol. 46 Suppl 3, 2008, pp. S157-67.
Strikas RA, Neff LJ, Rotz L, et al. US Civilian Smallpox Preparedness and Response Program, 2003. Clin Infect Dis. 2008;46 Suppl 3:S157-67.
Strikas, R. A., Neff, L. J., Rotz, L., Cono, J., Knutson, D., Henderson, J., & Orenstein, W. A. (2008). US Civilian Smallpox Preparedness and Response Program, 2003. Clinical Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, 46 Suppl 3, S157-67. https://doi.org/10.1086/524751
Strikas RA, et al. US Civilian Smallpox Preparedness and Response Program, 2003. Clin Infect Dis. 2008 Mar 15;46 Suppl 3:S157-67. PubMed PMID: 18284355.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - US Civilian Smallpox Preparedness and Response Program, 2003. AU - Strikas,Raymond A, AU - Neff,Linda J, AU - Rotz,Lisa, AU - Cono,Joanne, AU - Knutson,Donna, AU - Henderson,Joseph, AU - Orenstein,Walter A, PY - 2008/3/20/pubmed PY - 2008/4/5/medline PY - 2008/3/20/entrez SP - S157 EP - 67 JF - Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America JO - Clin Infect Dis VL - 46 Suppl 3 N2 - Variola virus, the cause of smallpox disease, has been deemed a possible bioterrorism agent. Since November 2001, federal, state, and local public health partners implemented activities to prepare for a possible smallpox outbreak. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) produced and delivered training and educational materials for smallpox preparedness in many formats, developed detailed smallpox vaccine information statements about vaccine contraindications and vaccination site care, and established mechanisms to monitor and respond to adverse events after smallpox vaccination. The last included enhancements to the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, a pregnancy registry for inadvertently vaccinated pregnant women, and a Clinician Telephone Information Line to collect reports about adverse events. The civilian responder vaccination program was conducted with rigorous safety procedures, and few historically recognized adverse events were observed. However, myocarditis and/or pericarditis was newly recognized as an adverse event caused by the New York City Board of Health vaccinia vaccine strain. This smallpox preparedness program put into place a number of measures to advance the United States' readiness for a smallpox outbreak that have assisted in preparedness for other threats. SN - 1537-6591 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/18284355/US_Civilian_Smallpox_Preparedness_and_Response_Program_2003_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/cid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/524751 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -